Electroplating with Glass

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by Mustafa Umut Sarac, Nov 11, 2011.

  1. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    I searched the google but I found electroplating glass with metal lists. But I want to electroplate acrylic sculptures with glass or crystal.
    Is it possible ? ,

    Umut
     
  2. wildbillbugman

    wildbillbugman Member

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    Hello Umut,
    I have never heared of electroplating anything WITH glass. I do not think it possible, because glass is not conductive. If it was, printed circuit boards on epoxy-glass laminate would not be possible.
    Bill
     
  3. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    You could possibly vacuum deposit it, it's done with quartz to protect front surfaced mirrors.
     
  4. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    Bill ,

    I think there are conductive glasses used at electronics. If I can find conductive glass , Would it be possible to electroplate with glass on
    plastic ?

    Bob ,

    Vacuum deposit requires heat again . I want cold process technology.

    Anyone knows conductive glasses ?

    Umut
     
  5. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    I think conductive glass is plated with tin indium glass. I think there is no conductive glass thing.
     
  6. wildbillbugman

    wildbillbugman Member

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    Mustafa,
    I know that there are glass micro-baloons, that are coated with conductive metals. These are used in screen printing inks to create conducrive circuits. However, The reflectivity (light) is high.
    I think that you are looking for transparency.
     
  7. wildbillbugman

    wildbillbugman Member

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    Mustafa,
    I find your imagination to be inspiring. Don't ever become a Wisened Cynic. I did a bit of research this A.M. You might want to search " Conductive Screen Inks"; Conductive Glass Bubbles"; "Conductive Glass Fibers". This is a long-shot. But researching these topics might give you some ideas.
    Bill
     
  8. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    That much is clear.:wink::wink:
     
  9. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    I think a big problem if you could do it would be the difference in rates of expansion would quickly lead to cracks and separation. The micro-balloons might work well, but with a loss of transparency.
     
  10. wildbillbugman

    wildbillbugman Member

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    Mustafa,
    Pehaps the most expedient way to accompish what you are trying is to scrap the acrylic sculpting. Learn glass sculpting. There are many books and classes and workshops on this subject and many people do it.
    Bill
     
  11. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    I concur with Bill.
     
  12. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    Hi Umut,

    No, you can't electroplate glass onto something else, like a coating.

    There's a company here in the US that carries a wide range of plating supplies specifically for hobby and small business use. While you might not buy anything from them, a search of their website might give you some ideas. Caswell Plating http://www.caswellplating.com

    Good luck with the project.

    - Leigh
     
  13. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    Thank you all for wonderful suggestions. As Leigh pointed out , this webpage is wonderful. It is possible to mix powders with below listed liquid chemical
    and apply on to plastics and process with heat gun.

    This thread could be enlarged in to below thread also , there photo ceramic processes described.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum42/98125-photo-ceramic-processes.html

    and also this thread connected to
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum42/98147-metal-oxides-acrylic.html



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  14. papatorve

    papatorve Member

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    There is silver nanowire tech coming for the replacement of ending indium resource google this;

    24.02.2011?|?James Mitchell Crow?|?New Scientist