Enlarger in bedroom help needed

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Jim17x, Jul 29, 2012.

  1. Jim17x

    Jim17x Subscriber

    Messages:
    294
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hello everyone! Im setting up an enlarger in the only space i have and that happens to be my bedroom. I will build a table that will had 3 12x16 trays on the right side in front of the window but will need to enclose the area and make it light tight. Of course i will be sealing the 2 windows of light and want to hopefully enclose the area with a light tight cloth of some kind that can attach with Velcro or zippers. Has anyone experienced a situation like this before?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. M.A.Longmore

    M.A.Longmore Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,889
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Location:
    New York
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    .
    Welcome Home Jim !

    Ron
    .
     
  3. Jim17x

    Jim17x Subscriber

    Messages:
    294
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thank you Ron! I feel welcomed already.
     
  4. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    15,235
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  5. Lopaka

    Lopaka Member

    Messages:
    757
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Location:
    Michigan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  6. andrew.roos

    andrew.roos Subscriber

    Messages:
    568
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Location:
    Durban, Sout
    Shooter:
    35mm
    The Nova darkroom tent may be a simple solution. You can google it for more info.
     
  7. wildbill

    wildbill Member

    Messages:
    2,829
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I thought this thread was about something else. I keep getting spam about this same thing and they're trying to sell me some kinda pills:smile:
     
  8. lightwisps

    lightwisps Subscriber

    Messages:
    384
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Location:
    Almonte, Ont
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I use jet black felt. Works great and is cheap at discount fabric stores.

    Don
     
  9. Brian C. Miller

    Brian C. Miller Member

    Messages:
    495
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Location:
    Everett, WA
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    You can set up a "grow tent" made for hydroponics. These are supposed to be light-tight, although the inside is usually white or reflective.
     
  10. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

    Messages:
    2,255
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Shooter:
    35mm
    My first darkroom was in my bedroom. I got some thick black plastic sheets, cut them to the size of my windows and attached them with velcro. Worked perfectly most of the time. In high summer I found the heat from the sun could melt the glue on the velcro and the blackout would fall down. I used to fold up the plastic sheets when not in use and after a few years they developed pinholes at the folds. I also once left some chemistry in an open tray and went to bed - I had a rotten headache the next day.
     
  11. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,423
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    Location:
    The Armpit o
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    OOH! What model enlarger is that? It looks like the model I used in high school in 94!
     
  12. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

    Messages:
    19,495
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I put velco strips on the wall around the window. When I need the darkroom the blackout curtains have matching velco strips.

    Medical Question: Have you talked to your urologist about needing an enlarger in the bedroom?

    Steve
     
  13. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

    Messages:
    2,244
    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Location:
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I used to have the darkroom in one of my bedroom and I used the large plastic bag that came with the printing plate material. They are light proof and I attached them to the windows with velco. The curtain would cover them up so from the inside the room look fine. From outside of the house people often wonder what the heck I was doing. I do RA-4 drum processing so it's purely dry darkroom. I would take the loaded drum to the bathroom and process the print.
     
  14. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

    Messages:
    4,250
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    Location:
    Central Flor
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've been using two layers of "Contractor's cleaning bag" purchased from Home Depot. Cheap and durable.
     
  15. onepuff

    onepuff Member

    Messages:
    95
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2010
    Location:
    Scotland
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I've done just this in a few rooms! The cheapest product to use for windows is blackout cloth for curtains which you should be able to buy from just about any good cloth shop. They can also sell you white velcro - white will help it blend in with your widow frame though it will yellow with time and need replacing. Curtain blackout cloth works just fine with the velcro. You tend to find that if a product is targeted at the photographic market the price increases by a factor of 3-4.
     
  16. paul_c5x4

    paul_c5x4 Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2009
    Location:
    Ye Olde England
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Like Sirius Glass and onepuff, I too use a blackout cloth to mask the window - I also use one over the door. A couple of points about velcro. Use the self adhesive type and make sure the paint is sound around the window/door frames. Also, don't sew the stuff to the dark cloth - You'll end up with a long line of pinholes that may let light through.
     
  17. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

    Messages:
    19,495
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I also used velco to attach a blackout cloth over the door by putting the velco on the top of the door frame where it cannot be seen.
     
  18. jm94

    jm94 Member

    Messages:
    198
    Joined:
    May 9, 2011
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Being in a shared house, my darkroom which was formerly under the stairs at my old house is now in my bedroom. I have to black out the door cracks and window. Mine is a master bedroom though so I am better off, but it is full to bursting point! I have my trays in a walk in wardrobe all my gear is at ground level. +1 to not leaving chemistry in the trays, I have done that with developer once, felt like I was hungover but it quickly subsided. Ensure you are careful not to spill, especially as RA4 developer and also fixer can stain and RA4 developer is nearly impossible to remove. I have old carpet placed over areas where I work, saved my neck when I used to have my trays on the wardrobe shelf which collapsed, fixer and developer everywhere! Not the odourless kind of fixer either.

    Also I advise you pour chemicals back into ther bottles and don't carry full trays to and from the room, mind you I do have two floors to go down to my kitchen, so I carry the water bath tray down with the prints in it from a session, ready for a full wash. But it is doable! All the best,
    Jacob :smile:

    P.s if your room isn't fully blacked out there is a high chance of fogging paper and film and you should ensure that you let your eyes adjust before making judgment on weather it is sealed or not. Also if you are working at night light leaking in from Orange street lights I find doesn't fog ortho materials as quickly, so it could go unnoticed. But a high ASA film it would spell disaster or fog other films or panchromatic materials.
    I dd the street light experiment not long ago on ortho materials.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  19. MattPC

    MattPC Member

    Messages:
    44
    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    Location:
    Brisbane, Au
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    200 micron builders film. You might be able to make a frame from tomato stakes or similar material you can buy cheap from the same hardware store. Make the frame a tight fit inside your window frame then wrap the builders film over/around it and staple it on. simply push the blackout frame into your window frame. If it leaks a little light, work at night and expose negatives during daylight hours instead.

    This approach has the benefit of being very cheap, easily replaceable and not requiring repairs to the property when you want your rental bond back...

    Good luck,

    MattC
     
  20. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

    Messages:
    309
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    to lightproof my room i hit homebase/b&q who sell black rubble sacks. basically a lot thicker than a black bin bag. tape them over your window in double layers and theyre fully lightproof. willl cost you about £4 in total!
     
  21. Jim17x

    Jim17x Subscriber

    Messages:
    294
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thank you everyone for all the great advice! my original plan was to enclose the enlarger area with two walls and a door but now i have decided that it would be easier to just make the windows and the door in the room light tight. I will have more room to move around in..
     
  22. Jim17x

    Jim17x Subscriber

    Messages:
    294
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Its not much but i finally finished it.. I use heavy duty contractor bags to seal off the windows and they are light tight now. I decided to frame two walls and put a door in instead of some temporary hanging light tight material. I have no running water in there but i will get use to that. This took a big chunk of my bedroom but it was worth it..
     

    Attached Files:

  23. wiltw

    wiltw Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,071
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Location:
    SF Bay area
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Remember that light travels in straight line. So if it doesn't have an opportunity to 'reflect' off glossy or semi glossy surfaces, a 'light trap' works very effectively to keep light from entering a space.

    So I would shield the glass area to mask out most of the light during the day, but also use a secondary shield over the window opening on the inside wall as a 'trap' to catch any light that would sneak in past the mask. over the glass.
    Same principle (two layers, one inside the room and one outside the room, separated by the space of the door frame) would allow me to enter and exit the room yet sufficiently block the light to use my enlarger for color printing.
     
  24. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,199
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Another option would be to replace those blinds you currently have with ones that are light tight:
    [​IMG]
     
  25. paul ron

    paul ron Member

    Messages:
    1,443
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2004
    Location:
    NYC
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    My son did someting similar when he was in a college dorm room only he used his large alcove closet as his darkspace. Using foam boards (construction pink type sold at Home Depot) as blackout curtains ducktaped to the window jambs and a towel at the door sill did the trick.

    .