Enlarging Times

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by Flotsam, Sep 29, 2005.

  1. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    I am curious. About how long do you like to keep your exposure times when enlarging? I feel most comfortable around 15 or 20 seconds. My burns and dodges are more intuitive around there. I just had a 50 second exposure with some slower paper and it really threw my timing off.
     
  2. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    I think of 20 seconds as a kind of a minimum and I like to stay close to that range. I get bored with longer exposures and start making mistakes! :D

    (Probably too much TV as a child, or perhaps as an adult)
     
  3. photobackpacker

    photobackpacker Advertiser Advertiser

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    I am with you. 12 second minimum, 24 second Max. Shorter, I can't get done what I want - Longer and my mind wanders. Have you noticed when you try to do a graduated edge balancing burn-in, you have one set speed? Anything faster or slower is jerky?
     
  4. r-brian

    r-brian Member

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    Many times, in fact most times, I have a base exposure of 60-75 seconds and then start burning. This is with a f/11, 6x6 negative, 11x14 Ilford MGIV paper. I'm always amazed to hear people printing with such short base exposures.
     
  5. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    I’m just starting up with a second enlarger for 8x10 and am I getting confused or pushed . The 4x5 is a Saunders diffusion with dial in filters. For 16x20 Kentmere prints, 40-60 seconds with some surprises at 2-3 minutes. The 8x10 is an Aristo cold light 12x12 head. BAM!! 10-12 seconds for similar negatives, development, paper and exposure. I am adding a neutral density filter to slow that racer down a bit so I have time to react and dodge or burn.

    John Powers
     
  6. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    We have a 4X5 cold light head and it is also a bit much. I don't personally use it for that reason.

    Actually, in response to the above question, 11X14s tend to go a bit higher, closer to 45 seconds, and 16X20s get up there in time. I was mostly referring to 8X10s.
     
  7. jperkinson

    jperkinson Member

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    My graded paper 8x10s are usually around 35 seconds at f8.
     
  8. hortense

    hortense Member

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    With very little dodging and/or burning, I like about 30-seconds. Depending on the amount of dodging/burning, more. Using a cold light makes this process a little more complicated since 3-seconds burts max is a must to avoid overheating the tube (hence more light than planned).
     
  9. Loose Gravel

    Loose Gravel Member

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    I've always liked 10 to 15 seconds. For Christmas cards, I shorten the time as much as possible. Obviously, I choose an image that doesn't require much work for a Christmas card.
     
  10. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    10 seconds is my standard base exposure. Dodging and burning are fractions of a stop of that. Totals of exposures may be 60 seconds.
     
  11. Blighty

    Blighty Subscriber

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    "20~25 sec is good for me. Means burning or dodging times aren't impractically short.
     
  12. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    This is interesting. Enlarging being a generally solitary pursuit, you tend to arrive at your habits and preferences in a vacuum and sometimes you wonder how your own techniques match those of others who are working away in their own darkrooms. I especially relate to the comments on manipulation. In that 15-25 second range, my burns and dodges feel smooth and natural, at 60 secs they feel clumsy and unsure, I have to count along with my audible to know how much of a burn I'm giving and can hopefully repeat it.
     
  13. Marv

    Marv Member

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    Most come in between 24 to 36 seconds with 24 being optimum for a base exposure. I make the exposure in 3's; 3, 6, 9 12, 15 etc. Anything longer than 36 seonds seems to take forever.The same for the burns and dodges, increments of 3. For me manipulations at less than a 24 second base seem to be erratic and more noticable.
     
  14. Saganich

    Saganich Subscriber

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    Seems I watched too much TV as a kid as well. I max my base exposures between 16-20 seconds f11 with a V54 cold light and prefer short burn times, 6-7 seconds. I have a programable timer which helps immensely.