Ethol Blue Formula?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by sepiareverb, Jan 15, 2011.

  1. sepiareverb

    sepiareverb Subscriber

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    Just saw some old negatives, Tri-X I ran in Ethol Blue many years ago- and am wondering about mixing some of this up. Grit and grain has some appeal of late.

    I did some searching for the recipe, but no luck. Anybody??
     
  2. sepiareverb

    sepiareverb Subscriber

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    Found this, a start anyway.
     
  3. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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  4. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Looked for years and could never find a formula or something similar. It was popular for a time but was withdrawn by the manufacturer. Since it used sodium hydroxide as the activator and not sodium carbonate and contained hydroqinone it was not the same as the Beutler formula. The only thing even close and still made would be Ethol TEC.
     
  5. sepiareverb

    sepiareverb Subscriber

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    Grrrr.
     
  6. sepiareverb

    sepiareverb Subscriber

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    Got this email in response to my query about availability of Ethol Blue or the recipe from Omega/Brandess:

     
  7. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    Doesn't appear to be. Neofin Blue was reported to be a commercial version of the Beutler formula. Ethol Blue seems to be different. According to the MSDS, it appears to be an MQ developer with sodium hydroxide as the accelerator. Most developers using this combination are designed for high contrast, rapid processing, or both. X-ray developers commonly use these ingredients. But with sufficient dilution things can be calmed down. I notice there are several catechol based compensating developers that use sodium hydroxide at concentrations of 150 - 500 mg/l of working solution.
     
  8. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I've consulted my Photo Lab Index, and no recipe. There is plenty of info on use and time and temp charts for it though.