Experience with Super XX and Plus X?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Don Wallace, Oct 31, 2007.

  1. Don Wallace

    Don Wallace Member

    Messages:
    419
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    Ottawa, Cana
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Someone gave me several boxes of Super XX and Plus X, in 4x5. Does anyone have experience developing these in HC-110 in a rotary processor (Jobo CPE-2)? What would be a good starting time? Please don't send me to the massive dev chart. I am looking for folks with actual experience.

    Is HC-110 a good choice for these films? What are the relative strengths of these two films? Portrraits? Landscape? General use?
     
  2. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

    Messages:
    2,412
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Van Buren, A
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    General use. Great tones. HC-110 dilution B is good choice. I think you can get developing times for Kodak films in HC-110 from Kodak websites. All sheet film from Kodak come with data sheets in the film box with popular developer choices and times and temperatures. If you are using a Jobo, I would use the time suggested for continuous agitation. Kodak generally always gave processing times for HC-110.
     
  3. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,005
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Milan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have souped both, but never in HC110. The sheet inside one of my sxx boxes states:
    Cont. Agitation times
    hc110 A 65f/18c 4min 68f/20c 3.25min
    hc110b 65f/18c 5min 68f/20c 4.25min

    I have used with success
    D76 ei of 100 68f 13m 1:3
    Microdol-X ei of ~50 68f 11m (I think) 1:3
    ABC Pyro ei of ~25 The times and dilutions escape me but the pyro negs looked the best but the film speed was way to low for my intended uses.

    I can't help you with PXP (except that I think it looks great in D76 rated @just under 100 and soup'd as per kodak's instructions)
     
  4. Shawn Dougherty

    Shawn Dougherty Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,181
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Super XX?! That's some old stock and has certainly built up some base fog by now. Michael A. Smith and Paula Chamlee are still using this film, I would go to their website and forum to see what they recommend.

    www.michaelandpaula.com
     
  5. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,005
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Milan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    They recommend DBI. I have 15yr out of date film (exp 1992) that has very little base fog, but appears to have lost speed -- I am unable to get a normal contrast neg at anything faster than about EI 100.
     
  6. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,102
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    My Super XX expired in 1988, but I can still use it at ISO 100 and get some nice negatives with a bit of fog. I use D-76 at 7 - 9 minutes.

    PE
     
  7. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,005
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Milan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    PE
    What dilution and temp are you useing?
     
  8. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,102
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I used the D-76 straight and at 68 deg F.

    I should add that this was tray or tank, not rotary.

    Sorry.

    PE
     
  9. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

    Messages:
    2,412
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Van Buren, A
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    HC-110 is the developer of choice for many photographers that like to use older out-of-date film and get good negatives. HC-110 tends to minimize age fog, unlike D-76..which will show a little more fog with old film. I have Plus-X from1982 that is just fine, when developed in HC-110b. You should always presoak in water, and I think from personal experience, this is quite important with older film, as it "opens up" the pores of the emulsion, so to speak, and allows for more even development across the whole face of the sheet. This is just a personal observation. A good soak for about 4 minutes in water same temp as developer is about right.
     
  10. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,561
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Location:
    Pacific Nort
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    My first use of Super XX was at Brooks, first assignment, it is one of the films that can be used for nearly anything, I used it for medium shots of objects and developed it in HC110 dil. B. It's a very nice film, enjoy it. You may have to add some restrainer if fog shows up. Run one to see.

    Curt
     
  11. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,102
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Even with fog it is a fine film. The scale is long enough to tolerate some degree of fog.

    PE
     
  12. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

    Messages:
    2,058
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    If you don't want to fool with the XX, I will be happy to pay a fair price for it.
    I love the stuff.
     
  13. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,102
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have some here, I think. :D

    Free for postage if I have any.

    PE
     
  14. Don Wallace

    Don Wallace Member

    Messages:
    419
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    Ottawa, Cana
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Thanks very much folks. As usual, a wealth of information. I look forward to my trip to Retrotown with Plus X and Super XX! I am going to test a few sheets this weekend. I don't have tons of it, so your suggestions are very helpful.