Expired film from 1994

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by StigHagen, Dec 12, 2011.

  1. StigHagen

    StigHagen Member

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    Hi!

    I have the chance to buy Ilford HP5 film that has been in the freezer all this years, they expired in 1994. Would that be risky to buy? Does it make any difference?

    Sincerely,
    Stig
     
  2. JLP

    JLP Subscriber

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    HP5 does not have the best keeping properties so i think you would be taking a risk buying this. It will most likely have some severe fogging.
    Can you test a sheet or roll before you buy?
     
  3. Jojje

    Jojje Member

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    If it really has been refrigerated - no problem at all.
    I once had an exposed HP 5 in the fridge i.e. below +6 degrees Centigrade for 12 years before development. It came out just fine when I finally developed it.
     
  4. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    Yep no problem. Rate it slower, maybe 200 or so... and just bracket and see what works for you. It will have lost some contrast and will probably make a nice portrait film.

    I have shot panatomic x that was 30+ years old, unrefrigerated, and no problem at all. There was base fog for sure but the film was still very usable. A faster film like hp5 will have more base fog but I bet it'll still make a very nice low contrast 200-speed film.
     
  5. Aron

    Aron Subscriber

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    The best answer I can give is to buy only a couple of rolls, test them and then buy the whole lot if you like it.

    I prefer to use fresh film but here is my experience regarding expired HP5:

    3 years expired, stored on the shelf of a shop (20-35 C): high base fog and lowish speed.

    28 years expired, stored on the shelf: the same as above, but it wasn't as much worse as I had expected it to be.

    Give it a try, you might like the result, but don't expect miracles.
     
  6. StigHagen

    StigHagen Member

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    It has been in the freezer (not refrigirator or on the shelf)...it should make a big difference I guess? Any with experience of old freezed film?

    It is ULF film, so buying one box is still a bit expensive, so knowing before trying would be prefered.
     
  7. MartinB

    MartinB Member

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    I had a roll of 35mm HP5 that I exposed in 1976 and processed around 1999 - it was in a box in the garage for all those years that in the winter is around 5C and summer around 16C. I guessed that it would have lost some contrast so I developed it about 30% more. It came out fine when processed, no appreciable base fog. My guess is that being kept coolish (though not in a freezer) helped.

    I have no experience with HP5 frozen for years but I would think it would be OK as long as it never got wet. Maybe someone with direct experience with frozen HP5 can comment.

    Martin
     
  8. Simon R Galley

    Simon R Galley Subscriber

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    Dear StigHagen,

    Film 17 years out of date has a manufacture date of 1989.

    I would certainly not buy without trying it first, also make sure its all the same batch.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :