Exposure help

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by dustym, Nov 7, 2005.

  1. dustym

    dustym Member

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    I took this shot on a film test 50 iso at f16 @ 1 second
    the sky was black ,I metered for the shadow in the base of the building, also for foreground this was the result I got
    the sky pretty much burnt out , and I may have overexposed the print. I have attaced an image

    I need some advice on metering such a seen

    rgds
    dusty
     

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  2. haris

    haris Guest

    dustym, maybe answers on mine question posted here on apug (expose for shadows develop for highlights) can help you, please check: http://www.apug.org/forums/showthread.php?t=21044.

    Next thing, I would try to use yellow or orange or even red filter for darkening sky.

    And, check your negative again. If there is some details on sky, if sky is not complete washed out, maybe burning the sky during printing could help.
     
  3. Marc Leest

    Marc Leest Member

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    You have placed Zone III on Zone V and hence overexposed almost 2 stops
     
  4. MurrayMinchin

    MurrayMinchin Membership Council Council

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    Are you sure the sky was "black"? It appears to be a lightly overcast day, and the photograph was taken into the sun, as there is flare over the top of the building...?

    Murray
     
  5. dustym

    dustym Member

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    The sky was very overcast I toyed with the idea of using a red filter but I thought it would be overkill
     
  6. Donald Miller

    Donald Miller Member

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    Without metering the scene, the exposure would have been F16 at 1/60 second in bright sunlight. Allowing two additional stops of exposure because the overcast conditions makes the correct exposure F16 at 1/15 second.

    You overexposed by four stops. Not two stops as someone else suggested.

    Considering the scene, had I made this exposure I probably would have exposed this at F16 1/3 and given N+ development to gain better sky value separation.
     
  7. lee

    lee Member

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    I agree with Donald



    lee\c
     
  8. dustym

    dustym Member

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    Thanks very much for the advice Im afraid zone three on on zone 5 does not mean a lot to me at the moment I iwll have to read up on Mr Adams, Im using a Sekonic light meter
    so would I take the meter reading and adjust two stops for the shadow rule to get an overall reading, the meter reading was taken from the apron of the building in the darkest part so is that why I overexposed on the sky, the meter on this shot trold me f16 at 1 second on 50 iso
     
  9. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    And if the sky was "very overcast" you will not get any significant detail regardless of filter. The filter (yellow, orange, red) darkens the blue in the sky - without blue being there - very overcast - the filter would have no real effect.
    juan
     
  10. dustym

    dustym Member

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    I tried Les Macleans theory today and my negatives look the best that I have produced. contrast sharpness and depth I will try printing one tonight.

    rgds
    dusty
     
  11. Donald Miller

    Donald Miller Member

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    You were correct in metering where you did...If you meter the darkest shadow that you want meaningful detail to be shown (I do not mean small insignificant areas of extremely deep shadow---rather the larger shadow areas) then decrease your exposure by two to three stops from what your meter shows. Your meter, and all meters for that matter, are designed to convert the metered value to a middle gray.(18% ...16% on some Sekonics) That is why you overexposed.