Exposure journal

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by zackesch, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. zackesch

    zackesch Member

    Messages:
    127
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    Waukesha, WI
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I would like to start an exposure journal, and work out a format but im having trouble on what information should be recorded. What im thinking of is film make and ISO, body, lens, f/stop and shutter speed. At the end of the list for that roll of film, I would like to keep record of what dev, stop and fixer was used along with time and temp.

    Are there any examples out there or is there any information that could be added?
     
  2. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,665
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    filter(s), and how you metered.
     
  3. zackesch

    zackesch Member

    Messages:
    127
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    Waukesha, WI
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I should also add when, where and time. I also think it would be handy to number the rolls too. That way i can have a quick refrence to where that frame is.
     
  4. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,665
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    When I record data I number each roll (date and numerical sequence number, like 2012-11-16-R001-F1, where R = roll and F = Frame) since some data may not apply to the entire roll.
     
  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,665
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    ... and, yes... who, what, where, when, why.
     
  6. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,665
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  7. zackesch

    zackesch Member

    Messages:
    127
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    Waukesha, WI
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Brian, I like your Idea. I do plan to have the info per frame, and have a dev note at the end for that roll. Would you mind if I use your format?
     
  8. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,665
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Sure... that is no patented secret formula. Enjoy!
     
  9. zackesch

    zackesch Member

    Messages:
    127
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    Waukesha, WI
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Thanks. I wanted to make sure I wasn't stealing your brain child.
     
  10. Allen Friday

    Allen Friday Member

    Messages:
    877
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    I have used a few different journals over the years. The information recorded depended on the purpose for the journal. When I was working to improve my exposure technique, I wrote down info which I could refer back to later to help me understand why certain exposures were not as good as others. When I was learning film development, I kept copious notes on development time, temperature etc. When I traveled to exotic locations, I kept track of where the exposure was made.

    A photographer can spend a lot of time and energy keeping notes, but to what end? I think the first step is to figure out why you are keeping the journal. Then figure out the information you need to record to accomplish that goal.
     
  11. Aja B

    Aja B Member

    Messages:
    132
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm
    You're referring to two different things here, exposure journal and development journal. To the exp journal notes I would add:

    1) film rating if different from box speed.

    2) meticulous notes re: a) precisely which subjects in the composition were metered (preferrably spot metered), b) their meter reading and c) if any + or - compensation was applied. This really gets to the heart of the matter when it comes to an exp journal. Center weighted and matrix metering won't give you sufficient control/feedback to yield consistent results. Consistency is the name of the game, eh?

    3) filter, if any.

    4) any other miscellaneous notes that might interest you to determine what went right/wrong w/ various aspects (sharpness, etc.) of an image, e.g. use of tripod, cable release, flash info, mirror-lock, etc.

    Create your own Excel spreadsheet. The journal-keeping is largely neglected but extremely helpful.
     
  12. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

    Messages:
    368
    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Location:
    Bavaria, Ger
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I';ve made my own, including most pertinent information, in Excel format. It has pages for film exposure, Digital, development, and printing. It includes some notes for reference. I can send it to you, if you'd like.
     
  13. Dan Henderson

    Dan Henderson Member

    Messages:
    1,888
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2005
    Location:
    Blue Ridge,
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
  14. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,716
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Why would you want to do this?
     
  15. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,665
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Perhaps, like me, it is an accomodation to help with a bad memory.
     
  16. Jeff Searust

    Jeff Searust Member

    Messages:
    361
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
    Didn't Fred Picker sell some sort of notebook like that?

    I end up using just a blank sheet of paper per roll to take notes on -- I do the same thing per every 3 or 4 film holders for LF work. -- not everything is important every time, but the basics of each shot get recorded along with any ideas I have either in the field when taking the shot or developing or printing. I have always said that the items more photographers analog or digital need to have in their bags is a pencil and paper.
     
  17. zackesch

    zackesch Member

    Messages:
    127
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    Waukesha, WI
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Cliveh, the reason I want to keep an exposure journal is to be used as a learning tool. I am VERY new to film photography, and this is my first time taking photography seriously.


    Dan, your form is what gave me the idea. Thanks! :smile:


    Brian, thanks for the link. I'm taking a close look at it.
     
  18. NedL

    NedL Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,814
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2012
    Location:
    Sonoma County, California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have separate little notebooks for exposure and developing. Beyond what was already mentioned, I sometimes use hyperfocal focusing, and I sometimes "hedge" by 1/2 stop or more from the markings on the lens, so I write down how I focused ( incl if set to infinity. ) Also, I'm usually trying to think about what I'll be doing to print, so I will make a note about what I intended for a highlight or a shadow area, and I almost always make a note about the thought process of my metering ( e.g. set at shadow +2, or highlight -1... )

    Like someone else said above, it probably depends on what you are trying to accomplish. I'm trying to do well with my exposure and the notes so far have been very helpful in homing in on what works for me. I probably don't need notes anymore for my F3 for hyperfocal because I've developed a very good sense of how much I can do, but I still don't have a handle on DOF on my folder and some older cameras so I'm hoping the notes will help.
     
  19. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,623
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Location:
    Ann Arbor, M
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've recorded what I felt was pertinent info on 3x5 cards, but rather than bind them, I slip them into the ziplock bag (for each numbered holder) so when I get around to developing, etc. there is no problem matching notes to the shot.
     
  20. zackesch

    zackesch Member

    Messages:
    127
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    Waukesha, WI
    Shooter:
    35mm
    After looking at the information and ideas that came in my direction, here is where I'm at. My goal for an exposure journal is to keep an accurate record that I can use for developing and printing. The data that I think will give me the information needed are: Film make and ISO, EI, date, roll, frame, body, exposure compensation, f stop and shutter speed. The only info that will be written every exposure will be: frame, date, f stop, shutter speed, exposure value, filter if used , EV compensation and notes if needed.
     
  21. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

    Messages:
    368
    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Location:
    Bavaria, Ger
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    It's also extremely useful in organizing your negatives if you have detailed notes! It'll help finding what you want, and when discussing your images later.
     
  22. Usagi

    Usagi Member

    Messages:
    360
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2007
    Location:
    Turku, Finla
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I use exposure journal. Usually data which I write down varies. It might be just quick note describing subject or there might be lot of information about visualization, zones, SBR, lens, filters, my own mood, notes about subject, etc

    However there's always the film cassette number and side (I use red and green dots for different sides of each numbered film cassette), camera, film, EI and lens.

    So the journal also works as base of my negative archive. Also as an backup.

    It's also useful when tracking down some problem like light leak. I can easily check the used film cassette etc.

    On a longer trips it's sometimes like a full journal.


    The one thing that I don't record on the journal is the development and printing data. Those are kept in different notes along the negatives.

    Also, I don't like restrictive forms, so I write everything on plain notebook. Some 15 or 20 years ago I tried to use printed forms (like one introduced in Adams books) but it just didn't work for me.

    Keeping notes is habit that I can't work without. I use separate note even for 35mm snapshots...


    For a last; the journal also works as quick reference. In have resiprocity curves, filter corrections, etc. Information on it.
     
  23. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,213
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Location:
    Florida
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    as an alternative, i oftrn use a voice recorder to speak the xposure data. this is quick, and i can write it all down when i get back home without wasting valuable shooting time. this has proven o be lesshcumbersome than taking notes in the field.
     
  24. Doremus Scudder

    Doremus Scudder Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    Location:
    Oregon and Austria
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Here's my exposure record. Maybe it will be of use to the OP and others formulating one for themselves.
    I shoot sheet film, not roll film. Every set-up gets one of these exposure record sheets, but this often includes 2 or more actual sheets of film.

    I made this in MS Word, and print them out one-sided. Other notes can then go on the back. After cutting apart and punching holes, they fit in a small six-ring pocket notebook, which is easily obtainable in the U.S. (I have another, slightly different format for Europe).

    The exposure record stays with the negative through processing and is filed together in the binder with the neg. All my holders have a numbering system filed into the flap for easy ID.

    The arithmetic values for the Zones are useful when making multiple exposures or pre-flashing. Important subject areas are identified and the exposure value from my meter entered under the appropriate zones. The bottom of the record is a worksheet for adjusting exposure for reciprocity, bellows extension and filter factors (I have tables for the first two in the same notebook) and is therefore more than just a record.

    Although I agree with Ralph that often time is of the essence and keeping records gets in the way, I usually have time when determining exposure and after the shot to keep notes. It helps me to see graphically where the values fall on the Zone scale.

    For roll film one would have to modify somewhat; perhaps making a sheet for several exposures.

    Hope this helps,

    Doremus

    www.DoremusScudder.com
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 22, 2012
  25. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

    Messages:
    368
    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Location:
    Bavaria, Ger
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I just figured out how to attach my file. In case anyone else is interested
     

    Attached Files: