EXPOSURE / SHUTSPEED

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by STEVEP51, Jun 1, 2013.

  1. STEVEP51

    STEVEP51 Member

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    can someone tell me what f/stop/and shutter speed is normally used for a clear sunny day for a landscape/sharpe detail many thanks steve.
     
  2. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    f/16 at 1/125 second

    The "rule" is called "Sunny-16" and the idea is the f/stop is f/16

    Then the shutter speed is 1/ the ISO or rated speed of the film

    In my case I rate 400 speed film at 250 for landscapes and so my case I use f/16 at 1/250 second

    In your case, I assume you were using a slow, fine-grain film that might be 100 speed so you could use f/16 at 1/125 second

    You could, if you are using 100 speed film, choose to expose it as if it were 64 speed, and give f/16 at 1/60 second

    For landscape in black and white it would be good.
     
  3. Alex Muir

    Alex Muir Member

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    You really need to take a meter reading, with the meter set for your film speed. A small aperture like f16 or 22 will give good depth of field meaning that the subject will be in focus from close to the camera into the distance( depending on how you set the focus). Sharpness is normally best from about two stops down from maximum aperture, and falls off towards the smallest aperture. There are some good books available on the subject of exposure that may help. Check Amazon, although I pick up lots of photo books in charity shops. Alex
     
  4. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Exactly what Bill said. Sunny 16 unless your are at extreme Northern or Southern Latitudes, then it is Sunny 11.

    It is never sunny in Rochester New York because of the lake effect. George Eastman founded Eastman Kodak in Rochester because it is the world's largest natural darkroom. Also the normal overcast gray sky in Rochester was the color and inspiration for the Standard 16% Gray card.
     
  5. Stephen Benskin

    Stephen Benskin Member

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    That's a myth.
     
  6. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    The part about the worlds largest natural darkroom? Can't be - my boss told me that one.

    p.s. STEVP51,

    I really wanted to make my first post:

    f/16 at 1/125

    without any further explanation...

    Because really, that would probably work for anybody, anywhere, any (black and white) film*.

    *With the obvious exception of the specialty slow and super fast films.

    The latitude of negative film to overexposure is why simple box cameras work so well.
     
  7. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Yes, it is a myth, but there is so many apparent elements of truth it that I find it hard not to pass on. :whistling:
     
  8. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    I think Stephen really meant the gray card and the whole 18% is not middle gray thing.

    One thing I know for sure about a gray card: If you meter it... and shoot it as meter recommends... it will be properly exposed.
     
  9. Toffle

    Toffle Member

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    Not to hijack the thread, but I have often wondered if the dull grey (or gray) of my vintage Tamrac Expedition was chosen so that it could act as an in-the-field grey (or gray) card. It works... when in doubt meter the camera bag.
     
  10. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Use a densitometer or spectrophotometer to check it out if it's really 18% gray.
     
  11. Toffle

    Toffle Member

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    I possess neither of these fine tools, but I do have negatives that are exposed to my expectations, so I would guess that it must be close enough to serve the purpose.
     
  12. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Or compare the reading you get off of it with a reading from a grey card.
     
  13. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    It's likely not "spectrally neutral" enough to be a reliable gray reference. But there's nothing wrong with using it. And then depending on if your results are good, too light or too dark, you'll know how good a reference it is.
     
  14. STEVEP51

    STEVEP51 Member

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    EXPOSURE/SHUTSPEED

    THANKS GUYS found all your threads really helpfull.steve.
     
  15. Toffle

    Toffle Member

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    You are right there... there are far too many types of beer spilled on my camera case to guarantee any sort of spectral consistency.