f/stop printing and 0/00 filters for burning.

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by baachitraka, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. baachitraka

    baachitraka Subscriber

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    After establishing the base exposure to 25.4 sec, I found nothing on the paper for highlights. Aparently I start to burn for 9.9 sec with all those gymnastics.

    My question is can I use 0/00 filter to print highlights without all those gymnastics. Will it work? Its not split-grade, I just curious about using 0/00 filter to get highlights on the paper...
     
  2. Brook Hill

    Brook Hill Subscriber

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    Burning in the highlights at grade 0/00 should get some tone in the area but it may be a bit flat without the sparkle. One tip by Les McLean is to burn in highlights with grade 5; if there is any hint of detail in there then the grade 5 filter will bring it out. Its worth a try.

    Tony
     
  3. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    In general, unless the highlights of the neg you are working with are very dense, your base exposure should get you the highlight detail you want. You control the shadow rendition with changes in contrast.
    What filter are you using for the base exposure?
    All that said, you can burn with whatever filtration does the trick, which is one of the nice things about VC papers.
    If the highlights are too dense in the neg, you may want to consider flashing the paper to get some tone into the highlights instead of complicated burning.
     
  4. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    If the neg in question is an exception and you can normally print highlights without burning-in or at least get something on the paper then that's fine. However if highlights are always a big problem then it might be worth looking at your development times. Unprintable highlights at exposures that print lower zones OK suggests over-development.

    Try progressively reducing development times for your films by say 10% if development times are less than 10 mins and maybe 15% if times are much over 10 mins to see if this makes a difference. Then if it's not enough and it may not be enough reduce by another 10%

    Worth a try. A 10% reduction should show some difference and isn't going to result in a disaster of thin negs

    pentaxuser
     
  5. andrew.roos

    andrew.roos Subscriber

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    It sounds as though you are suggesting using a very soft (0/00) grade instead of burning in order to retain highlights. The problem is that this will reduce local contrast throughout the print, making it flatter and with less snap. The advantage of burning is that it allows you to reduce global contrast, by burning the lighter areas, without affecting local contrast.
     
  6. baachitraka

    baachitraka Subscriber

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    Scene: St. Mark's Square. The side wall was in a shadow and part of the tower was lit by evening sun and dispersed clouds.

    Paper: MCP 312.

    Developer: Adox Adotol NE.

    Negative: I see the dispersed clouds(very dense), developed using Rodinal 1+50(15mins with 3 inversions @every 5mins) and was using Yellow-Green filter.

    Grade 3: Shadowed wall was rather beautiful but with no highlights at all.

    Grade 2: Shadowed wall was soft but there is an hint of highlight.

    Since, I could not able to decide during printing session so waited till the prints get dry.

    During next session, I thinking to go with Grade 2 and test with 1/3 and 2/3 more stop to overall print.

    Nevertheless, f/stop printing is more fun.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2012
  7. baachitraka

    baachitraka Subscriber

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    I was only thinking to use 0/00 after base exposure was made either with a filter or no filter.

    Base exposure: With or without filter which results in no highlights.
    +
    Expose with 0/00 only, after the base exposure.
     
  8. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Ideally your test strip with f/stop printing will determine your highlights, then you alter your shadow rendition by changing contrast.

    It sounds like you had a very strong contrast situation, and that you have overdeveloped the highilghts. You are on the right track with using compensating development (5min agitation), but your development time for this neg may have to be shorter.

    Instead of using very soft filters, which tend to produce low local contrast in your print, I recommend practicing flashing, which helps preserve local contrast better than using lower contrast filtration.

    The idea of burning in the sky with Grade 5 filtration is also a good one, because it does add some texture to the print, if there is tonal variation in the highlights of the negative.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2012
  9. Rafal Lukawiecki

    Rafal Lukawiecki Subscriber

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    Just watch out for any excessive grain that may suddenly appear in otherwise smooth areas, such as the sky or clouds, when burning in with harder grades. While burning in with various grades is very useful, I feel that if you can burn it with the grade of the base exposure, it can make the print less complicated: both to make, and to appreciate.
     
  10. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    Yes you can use that 0/00 filter. You can also just use 'white' light for the burn, only the green part of the white light has a real effect on the highlights. The high contrast filter that blocks blue light (#5) will have little effect on the dense portion of highlights.
     
  11. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    This is valid for those who care a lot about grain. While I don't particularly care about minimizing grain, tonality ranks #1 in my list of priorities of achievement in a print. Grain might be noticeable up close when you push your nose against the print, but tonality screams at you from across a room.
     
  12. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    If you are burning in highlights then a #5 filter will give higher contrast - along with more grain, as previously noted. Burning with the same grade as you are using for the rest of the print may work best. Burning the highlights with a #00 will give about the same results as flashing.

    If you are flashing to bring up the highlights then a #00 is, theoretically, the filter to use. In practical terms, however, it makes no difference. You can use the printing grade or white light to equal effect.

    Giving an extra exposure with a #00 - such as using a #00 and a #2 1/2 - is the same as using split grade printing: the result will be a lower contrast print overall. Note there is no requirement for using only a #00 and #5 for split grade. Many split grade printers prefer a #0/#4 choice as they feel it gives better control; very few prints are made at the extremes of the contrast range. If you want something between #2 and #2 1/2 you can split the exposure between those two filters.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2012