Faded Latent Images

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by davetravis, Apr 25, 2008.

  1. davetravis

    davetravis Member

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    I just did a batch of E6.
    One roll was Provia that I shot last Sep/2007.
    I kept it in my basement area, but not frozen or in the fridge.
    Whack!!!
    95% dark!
    The letters and #'s on the edges correctly developed.
    All other rolls came out fine.
    Lesson learned...don't let exposed E6 films sit on the shelf for 7 months!
    Anyone ever have this happen?
    DT
     
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Dave;

    The edge numbers are also latent images put there when the film was packaged a year or more before you developed it. So...... I leave it to you to work out the rest.

    PE
     
  3. davetravis

    davetravis Member

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    Thanks PE.
    The probable cause must then be camera related during exposure.
    Bummer.
    All else from that trip turned out ok.
    Wouldn't you know it?
    Guess I'll never see what I captured...
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I had the same problem with my Nikon EL a while back. The meter failed but gave indications that were 'almost' believable. Turned out the same way yours did. Faint image, good edge marks. I had some beautiful (to me anyhow) shots of a herd of deer.

    PE
     
  5. davetravis

    davetravis Member

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    Hey, I know.
    Why don't we invent a type of image capture that doesn't depend on "post processing."
    You know, something like immediate preview or peel and view...:D
     
  6. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Dave;

    I would rather not speculate, as I get enough criticism just for what I'm doing now.

    :wink:

    PE
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I've processed exposed E6 much older than that. Sounds like something straightforward like setting the ASA dial on the wrong speed.
     
  8. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Oh, good point David. I had a strange problem with my RZ. Everything was dark, but everything was working. I changed lenses and did all the tests, but nothing made sense. I finally found that the gold contacts on the body that connect to the backs had somehow gotten dirty. A good cleanup and the camera was back in business.

    Until I cleaned the contacts though, everything came out dark.

    In the words of Mr. Scott "The more complex the plumbing, the easier it is to clog up the drain". I used that once at EK to explain why we were having problems with one of the new scale up units. I got a lot of mixed reactions. :D

    PE
     
  9. davetravis

    davetravis Member

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    How much older?
    And what did they look like?
     
  10. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I'm a bit embarrassed to admit that I've occasionally processed slide film that was more than two years old, and it looked as if I'd shot it the day before. I think modern films hold up pretty well. This would have been Provia 100F, 400F, and RMS.
     
  11. davetravis

    davetravis Member

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    This got me thinking what happened?
    Now I remember a "low battery warning" at the end of the trip. The Pentax 67II is supposed to continue correct exposure up until the final burst of energy...not!
    Solution...replace batteries at the warning.
    You'd think an old dummy like me would know better...
     
  12. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    That's the problem, Ron, there are so many people in this crazy modern world that don't know Star Trek quotes by heart!

    So the usual reaction you will get from someone that (foolishly) doesn't commit great Scottish rants or Shatnerian monologues to memory is: "What the HELL is this guy talking about?" :smile:

    To add a quote pertinant to this situation: "RISK is PART of the business. . . That's, why. . . we're out here. Thats, why. . . we're ABOARD her."

    To put it more succinctly though, this "risk" is totally avoidable by TESTING equipment, repeatly, before you shoot. Don't make any assumptions about the functionality of anything.
     
  13. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Karl;

    Fortunately, most all of the audience knew the quote as they were Trekkers. The mixed reaction came from their either laughing or their chagrin at realizing that the problem was there in front of their eyes. Overdesign and control software bugs.

    PE