faster film similar to across 100

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by rince, Aug 29, 2011.

  1. rince

    rince Member

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    Hi,
    I am looking for a faster film alternative to Acros 100. I am looking for a film with similar characteristics in probably 400 speed. I always thought there is an Acros 400, but I can not find it anywhere and in a local store I was told it is no longer made ... So anything you can recommend? Currently I develop Acros 100 in D-76.

    Thank you for your brilliant help
    Dennis
     
  2. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    Acros 100 is Neopan Acros 100, and there is a Neopan 400, but I believe the Neopan 400 is being phased out in some formats. Also, the 400 does not necessarily have similar characteristics to the Acros 100. It is a bit similar, but maybe there are other 400 speed films which are closer.
     
  3. rince

    rince Member

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    Thank you Kevin, I will definitely look into Neopan 400 if it is still available in 120
     
  4. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

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    What is it specifically about Acros that appeals to you? If you like the fine grain, I would think that T-Max 400 is a good film, also Delta 400.
     
  5. Tony-S

    Tony-S Member

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    Neopan 400/120 is gone. You'll have a tough time finding it.
     
  6. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    I can't remember what got discontinued, but I think it was single rolls of Neopan 400 in 120, and I'm pretty sure you can still get pro-packs (5) in 120.
     
  7. Tony-S

    Tony-S Member

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    Nope, all Neopan 400/120 is DC.
     
  8. Mark Fisher

    Mark Fisher Subscriber

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    The closest I've found is Tmax400 in Xtol. I usually use Acros in Rodinal, but I couldn't get anywhere near 400 speed with TMY so I use xtol for it instead.
     
  9. rince

    rince Member

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    Thank you everyone. I looked for Neopan 400 online but did not have much luck. I guess I will try the Delta and Tmax 400 then. I love Acros for it's tonal range, the fain grain and the 'richness'. I am sorry that I can not describe it better. I really like how the tones blend.
     
  10. mesh

    mesh Member

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    I think you've described it well. I love Acros 100 because of the 'richness'. It's quite creamy and 'soft' whilst still being sharp... gee I can't explain it either ;-) I think TMAX 400 would be a good option as already suggested.
     
  11. ath

    ath Member

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    I second TMAX400 in XTOL (1+1 in my case)
     
  12. jp498

    jp498 Member

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    You might try Tmax 400 in pyrocat HD too. Full speed with the rich and creamy look.
     
  13. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    Stop looking for Neopan 400. Not only is it not like Acros but as mentioned in 120 it's discontinued. I'd also mention Tmax 400 as perhaps somewhat close to Acros but not knowing exactly what about Acros you like you'll gave to test/experiment to see what you think. But do not try too hard as likely it will never match what you like in Acros. So use Acros with a faster lens or a tripod instead. Acros is a lot like Acros, perhaps more so than any other film. ;-)
     
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  15. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    Delta 400 is an interesting film.. it has longer spectral sensitivity than other pan films.
     
  16. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    ACROS is orthopan, not panchromatic. It has a different look from ordinary panchromatic films, which would need a light yellow-green filter to achieve the same effect.
     
  17. rince

    rince Member

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    THank you everyone for the excellent advice. I will go out hunting for a few rolls of TMAX400 for a start and then see what else I will find.

    @Drew: I have to admit that I do not know half as much as I would like to and I guess I had to google 50% of your answer:smile: Thank you and you definitely showed me a good direction to look into and I will have to do some reading to fully understand the differences between the different film types. Would you have a recommended read on this topic?
     
  18. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Orthopan films are unusual, and I'm aware of only a couple of them being currently made. They are neither fully panchromatic past a medium-red sensitivity, nor are they truly ortho (red-blind), but somewhere inbetween. This gives them a more natural look for certain subjects, especially for foliage,
    and also for some portrait conditions. The other huge distinction of ACROS is that it is almost immune
    from reciprocity failure at long exposures, and is a wonderful choice for low-light or night conditions
    because the exposure timing is so predictable.
     
  19. Peter Schrager

    Peter Schrager Subscriber

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    you can use tmy2 with xtol 1+2 developed semi stand and get incredible results. there is really very little that the new tmy can't do...
    Best, Peter
     
  20. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    I'd try T-Max 400. X-Tol should be a good choice for the look you want.
     
  21. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    I never mentioned Acros in my statement, just Delta 400 which goes past pan. :smile:
     
  22. ath

    ath Member

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    Acros is not really orthopan. Fuji states this in the datasheet but in reality it behaves more like a panchromatic film. EFKE25 and 50 are orthopancromatic and show visibly darker reds.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 31, 2011
  23. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Just look at the spectral sensitivity diagram for ACROS. It IS orthopan. The curve drops dramatically
    mid-red. A simple test for this is to take a deep red filter like a 29 and see what happens. It acts like a
    sharp cutoff filter. You'll chop at least an entire Zone out of the shadows, and more exposure compensation won't salvage anything down there. With a medium red 25 you get a normal response with the ordinary 3-stop exposure factor. Also look at the rendition of greens. Much different than a
    pan film. If you add a yellow-green filter to the already orthopan response, yellow-greens in nature will
    come out almost white, way above the response of typical pan films. I've done many of these tests.
    ACROS is one of my favorite 4x5 films in the mtns because things take on a much more luminous natural
    quality.
     
  24. ath

    ath Member

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    Well, I DID look at the spectral sensitivity curves. Published curves are hard to interpret because nearly always vital information is missing (i.e. the way they were derived). Acros drops at ca. 640nm (-0,5 stops) , TMAX100 at ca. 640 to 650nm, depending on the graph you choose, EFKE25 at 625nm. Now, which one to call panchromatic and which one not?

    My experience is completely different. With a Red 29 Acros behaves nearly identical to Delta 100, same filter factor, same darkening of sky and so on. Probably because sensitivity of Delta 100 also drops at 640nm.

    The character of a film is much more than the label "orthopanchromatic".
     
  25. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Incorrect.

    Fuji's data sheet says orthopanchromatic. It's something in between full panchromatic and orthochromatic.
    The curve in their data sheet shows response to 640nm. Incidentally, that is as far as TMax 400 goes as well.
     
  26. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Very minor differences in the shape of the cutoff can make a huge difference in practice. TMY and Delta
    are not similar to ACROS at all in their red response. Like I said, just try working with a true red 29 filter
    and this becomes apparent. But ACROS isn't quite the same as Efke 25. Each of these films has its own
    personality. But if you don't understand the basic category of sensitivity, you can get into trouble.
    Probably most people don't note the distinction because use of a 25 med red filter is much more common than a 29. But try a hard green filter on foliage. An orthopan film will look virtually bleached out in comparison to a true panchromatic. I've made that mistake myself. Up in the high country, the orthopans give an entirely different look, much more airy, buoyant, but not like a true ortho either.