Favorite Color Film and Why?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Bromo33333, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. Bromo33333

    Bromo33333 Member

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    I prefer Ektachrome - I like the color blanace, what do you guys prefer?
     
  2. dmr

    dmr Member

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    I seem to always go back to the Fuji Superia series for color negatives no matter what I try. Very smooth response, and works very well in available light and strange light situations. They tell me (the ubiquitous "they") that this 4th color layer is responsible for this.

    Others I like are Kodachrome 64 for a slide film, and the rebranded Walgreens/Agfa 200 (which is now being closed out) for urban scenes -- not as punchy color as Fuji. I don't care for the W/A 400 (moot point now) and I had a disaster once with their 800. :sad:

    I like Kodak Gold 200 and their Ultra Color 400. Second choice to Fuji.

    I'm currently searchng for a Kodachrome replacement.
     
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  3. reellis67

    reellis67 Subscriber

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    In 35mm, which I use only for stereo slides these days, I still use Kodachrome 64. I've always used Kodachrome in 35mm so I can't really compare it to other films in that size. For larger positives (120 and 4x5) I like E100G, mainly due to more natural colors than the more saturated films. I've also used VS, but I prefer G. If K64 goes away, I'll likely use the 100G in 35mm as a replacement.

    - Randy
     
  4. Eric Leppanen

    Eric Leppanen Member

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    For scenic and exterior architectural work, I prefer to match film stock to scene contrast, so that I can achieve maximum tonal separation and detail. I shoot mostly LF (usually 8x10 these days) and am therefore limited to the emulsions available in that format.

    For evenly lit or low contrast scenes, I use high contrast Velvia 100 and E100VS. Lately I have generally preferred Velvia 100 since it is more receptive to pushing and pulling, and has smaller grain. But E100VS is an excellent film and has its distinct strengths (particularly its strong rendition of yellows and reds).

    For moderate contrast scenes, I use Provia 100F, which offers good color saturation and excellent processing flexibility for a chrome film (up to two stop push with little impact on color palette, which can be very useful when trying to achieve faster shutter speeds in windy conditions).

    For high contrast scenes, I use print film (Portra 160VC or, most recently, Pro 160S; also Portra 400NC when I need more speed). The newly announced updated versions of Portra also look very interesting.

    For portraits or interior architectural work, I use Pro 160S (and possibly in the future updated Portra 160NC) due to its low contrast, excellent handling of flesh tones, and flexibility with mixed lighting (I virtually never have to use color correction filters).
     
  5. GraemeMitchell

    GraemeMitchell Member

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    4x5 and 120/220: 400nc or NPH.
    35mm: 160nc or NPH

    Porta for a red/warm look, NPH for a cyan/cool look.

    For e-6, E200. Usually at 400 or 800.
     
  6. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    If I had to pick just one...I guess I'd have to say...eh, well...either Provia or E100G. Tough call. I really like 'em both.
     
  7. highpeak

    highpeak Member

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    print film-Fuji NPS160, because it gives me a nature skin tone and handle red color better. slide film-Velvia 100, because it not as saturated as velvia 50 and has a very fine grain.
     
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  8. mtnbkr

    mtnbkr Member

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    Most of my color film use is limited to family snaps and vacation photos. I like Fuji Reala 100 for this. It seems to strike the best balance of colors without being too muted or too saturated. Wal-Mart does a pretty good job processing it via their 1hr or 2day service, which is nice when you're out of town and need those pics of your family NOW. :smile:

    Chris
     
  9. hka

    hka Member

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    I use the Fuji NPC 160 Pro for negatives and for slides I like the Provia very much... Both do have nice saturated colors and good skin color reproduction.
     
  10. Uncle Bill

    Uncle Bill Subscriber

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    For slide I love Kodachrome 64 and when that disappears, I will continue on with E100VS and GX. I also like Velvia too. I like the results of Kodachrome, it has a retro feel to the shots, E100VS is nice, forgiving and no surprises. Velvia is great when you want lots of colour and you are not shooting people.

    For c-41 negative film Fuji Superia 100, 200, 400 and 800 all the way.

    Bill
     
  11. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Since about 1991 onward for landscape work my favorite color transparency film in 35mm to 4 x 5 has been Fujichrome Velvia 50. I have liked the color, sharpness, and grain of this film. Now that the film has been discontinued and after I run out of my stock or what I will still purchase, I hope to be able to adapt to Fujichrome Velvia 100.

    Rich
     
  12. Derek Lofgreen

    Derek Lofgreen Subscriber

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    I guess it depends on what I'm shooting. For transparency it's E100G, GX. I've used Velvia 100 once and I liked it but I can't say I fell in love with it. For print film Portra (all flavors) depending on the situation, Kodak ultra color stuff for popping color and Fuji Superia. Family shots Kodak 200. I will be trying more Velvia in the future just to get the hang of what that film does, it does render skis beautifully.

    D.
     
  13. HerrBremerhaven

    HerrBremerhaven Member

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    Mostly Kodak E100VS, for the reds and yellows. However, I shot lots of E200, which is medium contrast and renders nice blue skies; also pushes like no other transparency film on the market today. The only other E-6 film I use in as large quantities as these to is the new Fuji Astia 100F, largely choosen for the super clean look of the images.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio
     
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  15. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Which Ektachrome???

    I like EPP myself - but that's mostly because A: I know it, and B: I have it - in all sizes up to 13x18cm.

    However I have to admit to a certain dislike of Velvia. Summers around here show 6 million shades of green, and I'd hate it for all of them to come out as emerald.
     
  16. Bromo33333

    Bromo33333 Member

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    Oh - Just EPN. I prefer a more natural range of colors - I sometimes like saturated colors, but most of the time, neutral does it for me.
     
  17. bob100684

    bob100684 Member

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    When I'm at the store printing with an SFA(optical) portra 160 or reala.
    When I'm at the store with the frontier....the new 160S or reala.
     
  18. Philippe-Georges

    Philippe-Georges Member

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    Table top, food and others in studio : Provia 100 F in 6x6, 6x9, 4'x5', 13x18.
    Outdoors natural light : Velvia 100 F all sizes, and Provia 400 F in 6x6, 6x9, 6x17 (not in 35 mm).
    Outdoors mixed (flash or continous 5200°K) light : Provia 100 F all sizes.
    No C-41.
     
  19. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    Which Ektachrome? - there are so many. I've been pretty happy with EPP for sheet film, but I use E100VS and E100G for MF. I'm not completely happy with either, but I'm far from unhappy.

    I really prefer negative film. That is at least partly becayse I use rangefinder cameras a lot, and the dynamic range of negative films has advantages with them. (I don't have the luxury of graded ND filters, for instance.) Negative film is also just easier to work with at all stages of the photographic process. For accurate color, nothing is quite as good as Kodak Portra 160NC. But for landscapes, I like a little more punch. I've been using 400UC mostly (because it is available in 220, and 100UC, which is a bit better, is only available in 120), but it has changed recently and has become less accurate and a bit too punchy. I haven't tried the new Kodak Portra films, but I'm looking forward to them.
     
  20. Bromo33333

    Bromo33333 Member

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    Have a couple of rolls of E100G in 120 - though we haven't shot them.

     
  21. Bromo33333

    Bromo33333 Member

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    Forgot to add - for film VOLUME, it tends to be Kodak Max or "HD" for me since locally C-41 processing is very inexpensive.
     
  22. Earl Dunbar

    Earl Dunbar Member

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    For me, the ultimate is Kodachrome. I have 2 rolls of K25 in the fridge, and quite a few rolls of K64 as well. For C41 it's Porta 160NC and Reala 100. If I want more contrast I'll go for a Fuji; haven't tried the Kodak higher contrast films.

    B&D: I'm thinking of picketing State Street with a "Don't Take My Kodachrome Away" sign. What do you think?
     
  23. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    My favorite is FP-4. It really shows texture and can have a very long tonal range.

    :wink:
     
  24. Woolliscroft

    Woolliscroft Member

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    Not really a colour film though.

    I'd go for 400UC in 35mm and Portra 400VC in 220 for neg and Velvia 50 for slide.

    David.
     
  25. Bromo33333

    Bromo33333 Member

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    Heh - would make the cover of the papers at least! If they could see you through all the snow! :D

    Unfortunately most of the folks here won't even know what the heck you are talking about! :sad:

    [When I moved here and didn't see a proliferation of photo stores and cameras all over the place, I figured that the population wasn't as enthusiastic about photography as one would figure.
     
  26. Earl Dunbar

    Earl Dunbar Member

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    Bromo: Yup, same with me when I moved here. About 1 year or so ago I went into Rowe and asked for a C41 print film that could be push processed fairly well. The clerk, who wasn't a young person at all, said "You can't push C41 film." Huh? Maybe not in the mini-lab in Wegmans, but a custom lab can do it. What they might charge is a whole other story.

    The only camera store I've found in town that seems to know their stuff is Hahn. Wright has some good stuff but there's not a lot of knowledge or enthusiasm there.

    But at least Rowe sells a bunch of Pioneer plasma TVs....