Filing and Proofing 6x7

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by brian steinberger, Apr 26, 2009.

  1. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Member

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    I just got a nice used Mamiya 7II and shot a few rolls today, developed them and went to cut them tonight and put in printfile pages and realized that I don't have any sufficient sleeves. What are the best pages for 6x7 negatives, without overlapping negatives? Also, when going to proof, I'm used to 12 6x6 frames fitting nicely onto an 8x10 piece of paper. How am I to get around this with 6x7? They call it the "ideal" format, but when it comes to filing and proofing kind of confusing.
     
  2. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    There is or at least was a printfile for 6x7. I don't remember the model number. At least one of the big mailorder shops used to stock it. I can't remember if it was the west coast or the NY one -)
     
  3. markbau

    markbau Member

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    The "Print File" pages I use for 67 negs is: Style No. 120-4UB.

    There are are few other styles in the print file range but this is the one I like best.

    mark
     
  4. PVia

    PVia Member

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    Proofing all 10 negs is a pain...what I've done lately is to fit 9 on an 8x10 sheet horizontally. I take a 1/3-ish sheet of 5x7 paper and put it under the 10th neg in the PrintFile page and contact the whole thing together and tape that 10th proof to the back of the sheet.

    It worked for these last couple of rolls, but sometimes I just don't print the 10th neg.

    Of course you can just use an 11x14 sheet, but I hate wasting paper like that or stocking that size in RC just to make contacts, but that's just me.
     
  5. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Morning,

    I use 8 1/2 x 11 paper for contact sheets and normally do what PVia says--9 horizontally on a sheet. I can squeeze part of a tenth shot on, but lots of times I just eliminate an exposure which is obviously inferior in some respect. If I have several rolls to contact at the same time, I'll sometimes make a partial-size contact sheet for the "extras." Yes, contacting 6 x 7 images presents a problem, but having those terrific large negatives more than compensates for the minor frustrations.

    Konical
     
  6. mwdake

    mwdake Member

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    I had exaclty the same dilema a few months back when I aquired a Mamiya Rapid 100. How the hell do I get 10 negatives in my 120 PrintFile pages. I settled on the 120-3HB pages for now, they hold 3 strips of 3 6x7. Now what to do with the one left over.
     
  7. craigclu

    craigclu Subscriber

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    Another reason 6X8 could be called the ideal format instead? Anyway, for 6X7 I use the 3 strip 120 sheets and am surprisingly lucky at having a cull shot that can be avoided by picking the correct end of the film to begin cutting at. I used to use the over-sized sheets designed to accomodate 6X7 but never searched them out after using my old supply up. I also recall finding 3 ring binders that were meant for these over-size inserts. I've gotten into a habit of seldom printing proof sheets and simply use a built-in backlight box that's mounted in my darkroom counter and an over-sized, large loupe for determining worthiness to print.
     
  8. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    This is one reason I don't like 6x7. I wish that 6x8 was the RZ's "native" format.

    I ended up settling on using the same horizontal sleeves I use for my 6x9 negs. I cut the 6x7 frames into sets of two, so each page has eight frames. I put the remaining two into another page, and proof the last two on a strip of paper that I staple or tape to the main sheet. I fill up the empty slots with the last two frames from other rolls, labeled, of course.
     
  9. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Member

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    This sounds like a good idea. What printfile pages are you using to file them? I'm assuming its bad to over lap negatives in pages?
     
  10. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Member

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    Here's one method I've tried before for 6x7. You lose a little bit of the frames on the edges, but atleast you fit them all onto a sheet of 8x10. This may work ok for some images, such as these here, but other images (landscapes) you may want to see the entire frame.

    But the one problem with this setup though is that the negatives are cut and are now not appropriate for certain file pages.

    I'm thinking the best way to do it might be the printfile pages dedicated to 6x7 the cutting 2 strips of 3 and two strips of two and doing the contact just like below except the bottom two rows would be two sets of two. Seems logical, right?
     

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  11. Reinhold

    Reinhold Subscriber

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    It seems that proof sheet continuity is more important than a good filing system.

    Wait untill you have over 30 thousand negatives. Then you may find that the Print File System approach to filing and proofing isn't such a good way after all.

    Set up a good database.
    Catalog by topic.
    File by topic.
    One negative and it's proof per envelope.
    Individual envelopes from Archival Methods...
    http://www.archivalmethods.com/Product.cfm?categoryid=6&Productid=84
    Use a card file type cabinet.
    File by topic. (I already said that)
    The sooner you start, the less formidable the project.

    After 35 years, I can go to any negative in a few seconds regardless of negative size or when it was shot.

    More details? P.M. me

    Have fun...

    Reinhold

    www.classicBWphoto.com
     
  12. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    aye aye
     
  13. El Gringo

    El Gringo Subscriber

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    I've always used the 6x7 storage sheets and cut the roll into 2 frames, 3 frames, 3 frames and 2. I've just started to print contact proofs and have bought 9.5x12" paper, this fits the roll onto the sheet really neatly without the waste you would get from bigger sheets of paper.
     
  14. Allen Friday

    Allen Friday Member

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    Like was posted above, I used the standard 120 print file and put 9 negatives in it for proofing, 3 rows of 3 negatives each. For the 10th, I put it in a printfile with 9 individual spaces on the sheet. Every 9 rolls, I fill up the extra sheet. All print on 8x10 paper. So, for 9 complete rolls, I have 10 proof sheets.