film developer temperature

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by archer, Jul 23, 2009.

  1. archer

    archer Member

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    Can anyone tell me what the effect of raising standard developer temperature from 68 degrees to 75 degrees might be other than shortening development times? I'm asking because I was just given a brand new, in the box, Jobo Duolab and would like to develop my sheet film in the paper developer slots designed for 8x10 paper. I designed a holder that allows me to develop four sheets of 4x5 film on a single sheet of textured plastic so both sides of the film are exposed to the developer and the resulting negs are the most evenly developed sheet film i've ever seen, even better than the BTZS tubes I've been using but I'm concerned because the lowest temperature the Duolab can maintain is 75 degrees in the four processing slots. As all the chemicals are the same temperature, reticulation is not a problem but is there something else of which I should be aware?
    Denise Libby
     
  2. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

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    You may get increased grain at 75ºF compared to 68ºF. I did with Tetenal Ultrafin; when the processing temperature was lowered to approximately 68ºF grain reduced dramatically with ILFORD Delta 100. However, I use Pyrocat-HD at elevated temperatures without apparent ill-effect.

    Tom.
     
  3. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Here in Turkey I regularly process at 24°C (75°F) because on a day like today (40°C by the afternoon) and with tap water at about 28°C it's impossible to work at 20°C (68°F). I have to use ice to get to 24°C :D

    Modern films are fine at these temperatures, although more care is needed with Adox/EFKE films as they have far less hardening, but there's no issues as you plan to keep all steps at the same temperature.

    Tom, there shouldn't be any increase on grain, but if there's variations in temperature between steps this can cause micro-reticulation which causes grain clumping, so more apparent garin

    Ian
     
  4. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    I agree with Ian, in the summertime I use 24ºC as my standard developing temperature, I just cannot get it any lower, unless I use chilled water from the fridge, or ice in really hot weather.

    Mick.
     
  5. Wade D

    Wade D Member

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    As with the above comments I can't even get close to 68F in the summer. I did a roll of Tri-X 400 and a roll of Tmax 400 yesterday at 78F which is the lowest temp I can get in my darkroom this time of year. All solutions were the same temp and the wash water was 81F. After inspecting the negs with a loupe I found no ill effects at all.
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    I generally use 72F chemicals, as it seems this temperature is usually fairly easy to obtain consistently where I am. I have not noticed anything different than when I used to do it at 68F, except for times, of course. I still do Ekfe/Adox at 68F, because I think I once read some sort of "official" recommendation to do so. I always keep some distilled water in the fridge for mixing with room-temp. water for the Efke.
     
  7. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Can't help it. I thought you were using 2F chemicals... :D

     
  8. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    heh heh.

    (BTW, in case you were actually wondering, 2F/2F is not referring to Fahrenheit.)
     
  9. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    *******
    So what is it, then; your draft status in the War of 1812??:tongue:
     
  10. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    I guess I feel lucky to be in the northern US where the standard water temperature is 40-50 degrees F.
     
  11. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    :D

     
  12. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    I was 2 Fat and 2 Facetious to be drafted.
     
  13. mwdake

    mwdake Member

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    I too live in a warm climate where the summer time tap water temp is 25-26C and even in winter it is 22C.
    I found it was too much mucking about trying to cool things down so I just develop at the temp it comes out the tap.
    I usually use Microdol X and Pyrocat HD and I can't say I see too much difference in my negs.
     
  14. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    i dunno about that
    when i lived in somerville
    my tap water was about 74-76º in the summers.
    i had a fridge i would keep a "cold" cylinder
    to reduce my temps.
    but then i started to use a glycin developer
    and 72-75º was what it liked, so i stopped ...
     
  15. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    I don't see any difference, except for shorter development times, when using a warmer processing temperature. It is simply easier for me to maintain a 75 deg. F (24C) year round so I've standardized on that. Kodak publishes development times at various temperatures for their products. Other manufacturers don't. Ilford publishes a cross reference time/temperature conversion chart that works well for common MQ and PQ type developers that you can find here.
     
  16. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Well, they don't know what they were missing.

     
  17. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    It's OK. The Navy took me even though the land forces would not. :D