film in a bath tub

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by stephanie, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. stephanie

    stephanie Member

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    i just had a friend ask me if i had ever put my film in a tub to get an aging effect

    has anyone ever herd of this

    and is there any other suggestions for aging film
     
  2. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Unless the tub is full of some sort of liquid, nothing will happen..... ok, just kidding. :D But I think it's unclear what you mean.
     
  3. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    You want to age film in what way exactly?
     
  4. stephanie

    stephanie Member

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    in a bath tub full of water lol

    and i think were are going for a 60's color shift
     
  5. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I've heard of burning, scratching, sanding, toning, bleaching, and I'm not sure what else.
    Nothing specific to bathtubs though.

    Ektachrome (and lots of others) from the '60's will do that all by itself, no tub needed:smile:
     
  6. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    I don't know what water would do to film before processing. I think it might damage it a bit too much, like make it unusable. For color shifts, try heating it. Maybe put it in a 200 degree oven for an hour or something. I'd be very curious to see the result.
     
  7. stephanie

    stephanie Member

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    same here i told her what about expired film
    because expired paper sometimes has a yellow shift 60's looking shift
     
  8. stephanie

    stephanie Member

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    (to holmburgers )
    and that would not melt it ? at all
     
  9. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Leave the film in the sun outdoors for a few months. :surprised:

    Steve
     
  10. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    How about soaking in very warm(not hot) water to remove the AH coating prior to use. Might be able to do this with 35mm film in the cassette without removing the film first. May need several rinses to clear all the dye, then hope it doesnt stick together.
     
  11. Kevin Kehler

    Kevin Kehler Member

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    I left a Holga loaded with Ektar 100 in a car at +30 C degrees for 2 days; all the shrubs and greenery went blue/purple and my daughters skin looks like a boiled lobster. Not intentional but some interesting looks.
     
  12. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    Another vote here for finding expired film. It crops up on eBay with some regularity, although eBay isn't flooded with the stuff. FWIW, I bought some expired (1989 and 1992) Svema color slide and negative film a while back. I've got some of the results posted on my Flickr page. Most of the posts there are from the slide film, but I've got a couple of print film shots early (on the second Flickr page).

    Of course, if the film is too old or too exotic (like my Svema), you'll have a hard time with processing. I do my own processing and am comfortable mixing my own developers, so I managed to do the job with my Svema, albeit with some fudging on a few details. Formulas for C-22 (used for Kodak color print film prior to the 1970s) are readily available, should you get something that old. Most color print films sold in the US since sometime in the mid-to-late 1970s is C-41, which is the current process, so developing it shouldn't be a problem.
     
  13. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    I dont' think 200 degrees will melt it, as long as you don't set it on the metal (wrap it in a towel or something). Then again, IDK! and these other suggestions are probably better :wink: