film that rolls backwards help?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by jackie_like_the_chan, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. jackie_like_the_chan

    jackie_like_the_chan Member

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    I really don't know how else to explain it. I was loading it into my tank and could feel it changed direction like it was s shaped and then it jammed and i couldn't get it to load properly for the life of me. Has this happened to anyone else? It was in a camera I havent touched in awhile so maybe it got curled up wrong from sitting there too long?
     
  2. jackie_like_the_chan

    jackie_like_the_chan Member

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    and it gets weirder. I know that I took the full amount of photos I could, but when I developed it I found the last photo I took towards the beginning of the roll and photos I'd taken earlier towards the end but they were eaten pretty badly. I just wish I knew what I did.
     
  3. Chris Lange

    Chris Lange Member

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    If you were shooting the camera for the first time, it could be that the camera you have extracts the entire roll, and then as you shoot it retracts back into the canister...

    Other than that, I got nothing for ya.
     
  4. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    Which camera was it in, and for how long?
     
  5. Mark Crabtree

    Mark Crabtree Member

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    Sometimes you can salvage a poorly loaded roll by taking it off the reel and starting from the other (hopefully undamaged) end. Also, if the camera wraps the film backwards around the take-up spool, it helps to leave the film rewound into the cassette for a while before trying to put it on the developing reel. Especially if the film was in the camera for a while, the reverse curl can really make a mess of loading.
     
  6. jackie_like_the_chan

    jackie_like_the_chan Member

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    it was in my vivitar 3800n, which has always been very trusty for me, but the film was in there for about a month so i'm assuming it mustve gotten curled but that doesn't explain the last pic...
     
  7. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    Hmm, Mark's right. But I find it hard to believe that a month would cause such problems- I thought you were going to say a year or so! Oh well, better luck next time!
     
  8. Mark Crabtree

    Mark Crabtree Member

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    A month is plenty of time to take a set. Rewinding into the cassette a letting it sit overnight will remove most of the reverse curl. Of course the film and age matter to; it sure seems like film gets curlier as it get older, but probably just longer for the curl to set in.

    I don't know the Vivitar you mentioned, but I assumed the answers about it shooting from the end of the film back to the beginning was probably right. I've had at least one point and shoot that did that (maybe my Yashica T4).
     
  9. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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  10. jackie_like_the_chan

    jackie_like_the_chan Member

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    It wasn't bulk loaded and when I loaded it onto the reel it exploded in my hands and so I tried to put it on the reel and it felt wrong and then I felt it bend and twist and that was about the time I dropped the film in the dark :-/ It just frustrates me because I start another photography course at my local art college tomorrow and I feel I made a very very rookie mistake...
     
  11. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Well, at least one mystery is solved.

    When you picked up the film after it dropped, you picked up the other end, and therefore loaded it with the last photos going first into the centre of the developing reel.

    If it is any consolation, I've been doing this for 40+ years, and I too sometimes have trouble with a film that refuses to load easily. So it may be that you are being unfair to yourself when you describe this as a "very rookie mistake". The big advantage of course of having more experience is that it is easier to stay calm under the pressure :smile:.

    Humidity (either very low, or very high) is often the culprit. What type of reels and tanks are you using?
     
  12. DarkroomDan

    DarkroomDan Subscriber

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    Are you using plastic Paterson type reels? If so, were they completely dry when you started loading your film? A little moisture will cause the film to stick to the reel and make loading very difficult if not impossible. Also, I have read that some people using the plastic reels who also use Photo-Flo have had the film jam if they didn't thoroughly wash the reel the last time they used it.

    Dan
     
  13. jackie_like_the_chan

    jackie_like_the_chan Member

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    now i feel even sillier because it was a plastic reel (patterson) and I thought it was sufficiently dry but I'd done another roll maybe 15 minutes before... What a combo. *face palm*
     
  14. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Another valuable lesson that you won't soon forget :smile:.