Film with no anti-halation backing

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by thefizz, Sep 21, 2005.

  1. thefizz

    thefizz Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,132
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Location:
    Trim, Ireland
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I am looking for a B&W film (not IR) in 120 that has no anti-halation backing.

    I have heard Polypan F being mentioned on another site. Does anyone know where I can purchase this film or any alternatives.

    Thanks,
    Peter
     
  2. fhovie

    fhovie Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,247
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2003
    Location:
    Port Hueneme
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I am certain Delta 3200 has no backing - I think the old tri-x did not - or had very little
     
  3. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    8,003
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Milan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I think old tri-x did. It seems to me that when doing a prewash on Tri-x the water would come out green. This would indicate, at least to me, an anti-halation layer.
     
  4. fhovie

    fhovie Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,247
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2003
    Location:
    Port Hueneme
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    you are probably right for 35mm - I think my sheets and 120s came out clear though - in fact I know my old box of 8x10 washes out clear. There was definitiely a difference between formats
     
  5. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

    Messages:
    1,845
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Location:
    North Caroli
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Two different things, fhovie -- antihalation backing usually washes out of the film, but base density has more to do with preventing light piping than halation; as such, it's relatively rare to see the gray base in films that aren't expected to be cartridge loaded (and even then, if they're intended to be projected or viewed as a positive, they'll usually be on a clear base).

    The only current films I'm aware of without anithalation are infrared -- Kodak HIE (being phased out even in 70 mm, now, I gather) and Maco IR820c Aura. Kodachrome uses remjet, Ektachrome has a conventional wash-out antihalation.

    Lucky SHD 100 and 400 have a relatively inefficient antihalation layer -- they do halate a fair bit, significantly more than Plus-X and Tri-X -- but they do have one.
     
  6. boyooso

    boyooso Member

    Messages:
    323
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    what is Lucky SHD 100 and 400? are they B&W?

    Is it a consistent thing that the anit halation coating is somewhat ineffective?

    I am just thinking of contrast masking for ilfochrome classic :smile:
     
  7. thefizz

    thefizz Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,132
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Location:
    Trim, Ireland
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I have found the following info on Lucky SHD B&w film.

    "Lucky is the largest producer of photo-materials in China founded in 1958 and manufacuturers wide range of materials including black and white films and papers, colour and X-ray films. The factory has ISO9001 certification.
    Lucky films have been widely distributed in the USA for some years, where they gained a reputation for over-exposure effects and a cult following amongst the pinhole camera enthusiasts. These are the latest, improved, films which nevertheless still exhibit approximately the same spectral sensitivity and the equal sensitivity to colours across the spectrum, together with the typical Lucky over-exposure effects. Pictures taken with Lucky film appear somewhat different to other films as all colours, whether green, blue or red are rendered tone for tone to the grey scale.

    Lucky films are coated on a clear base giving shorter print exposure times and scanners are better able to capture the negative densities.

    The films should be loaded into the camera in subdued light or shadow as light hitting the film leader can be 'piped' along the film by the transparent base leading to unwanted fogging. It is also possible the the film pressure plate can reflect some light back into the film leading to over-exposure, particularly in the highlights. This effect can be used creatively, in pinhole cameras for example, or combined with a red filter to give pseudo infra-red pictures. In this case, over-expose and underdevelop (pull)."

    Sounds interesting, must give it a try.

    Peter
     
  8. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

    Messages:
    1,845
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Location:
    North Caroli
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Boyooso, I can't speak to consistent or inconsistent, having shot only two rolls, SHD 400 only, in 120 only. The film is so inexpensive, however, that you should just get a couple rolls and see for yourself. I quite liked it, but haven't had a chance to buy more since. J&C Photo carries it in 35 mm and 120.