Filter Brand

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by nufe, Dec 27, 2008.

  1. nufe

    nufe Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I'm pondering filters for my new 35mm gear/lenses and thought I would see if anyone has any experience with Cokin filters (www.cokin.com).

    My main interest in this brand is to facilitate having a single filter (system) that will match any size lens diameter. So I won't need to carry a 77mm and a 67mm of the same type.

    Does anyone have any experience with the Cokin brand? Also, are there other recommendations besides Cokin?

    Thanks for considering my questions.

    ~Jeff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 27, 2008
  2. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

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    You mean Cokin, right? Lee also makes similar filters I believe. The problem with the Cokins is that they scratch easily.
     
  3. nufe

    nufe Member

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    Yes, I mean Cokin.
     
  4. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    You can get similar interchangeability by using step down rings. Buy the largest filter you need and step down rings for any other sizes. I use 58mm filters on 55/52/49mm dia. lenses.
    IN total agreement w/marko re the durability of the Cokin plastic filters.
     
  5. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    There are some very good scratch proof coatings for plastics, I'm surprised Cokin doesn't use them.
     
  6. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    I must admit that i haven't seen Cokin filters up close for a long while.
    But that is because when i did, they were appallingly bad. Dreadful.

    Warped. Uneven colour. Wrong colour. Schlieren in the material. Just 'plain old' rubbish.

    Lee makes filters that are beyond all reproach. Very good.
    Cromatek is a bit less expensive (i believe - haven't checked lately) and are very good too.
    So i see no reason to waste money on Cokin filters.
    But 'ymmv', and all that.
     
  7. Richard Kelham

    Richard Kelham Member

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    I've not had QG's problem with Cokin, though I agree that Lee are better if you can afford them. My gripe with Cokin is that their ND filters are not actually neutral: they tend to impart a slightly warm cast, and of course they scratch easily if not cared for...

    I do also find the holder (P series) rather cumbersome so usually use screw-in filters with view cameras, or when discretion is required...
     
  8. André E.C.

    André E.C. Member

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    Buy the best filters you can possibly afford, don't save money on filters, I only use B+W glass filters or Nikon, they are made of the highest quality optical glass.

    Choose wisely!


    André
     
  9. Thanasis

    Thanasis Member

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    I've never used Cokin so I cannot really comment. But I have found Hoya screw on filters with step-up adapters to be very good.
     
  10. Chaplain Jeff

    Chaplain Jeff Member

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    Hello,

    They make (made? - are they still making filters?) a pro line as well that was much higher quality and would not scratch (as easily).

    Cokins were the first "effect" filters I ever owned, back in the early 80's. Let's just say that the results made me swear off filters completely until a few years ago when I started using polarixers.

    Here are the filters I use / prefer, in order:

    -Leica
    -Minolta
    -Nikon
    -Hoya ultra thins (for wide angle)
    -Tiffen, "Moose" filters only*

    That's all.



    *Used Tiffen "Moose" filters on my AF Nikkor lens shots outdoors for years. Don't own any anymore, so I don't use them (Leicas and Rokkors are naturally warm).
     
  11. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    As far as i know, the only difference between 'regular' Cokin A series filters, and their other series, including their Pro thingies, is the size of the filter.
    Not so?

    Anyway, curious about their current state of affairs, i checked their website.
    There they say that their regular filters are made of something called CR39, and that their Pro filters are made of a better stuff, called CR39.

    Must be me...
     
  12. mikebarger

    mikebarger Subscriber

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    I use the step ring plan also. My largest LF lens takes a 67mm filter, so I have step down rings for the smaller sizes. I used a drop of clear finger nail polish on the threads of the step ring so only the filter comes off, not both when changing filters

    It works well.


    Mike
     
  13. sidearm613

    sidearm613 Member

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    Tiffen and B+W make fabulous filters. Tiffen is making the Kodak Wratten filters now, which you might want to take into consideration. the problem is, both of those company's filters can be fabulously expensive if you happen to be budget bound. The solution lies in buying a Hoya filter, which is affordable yet of reasonable quality, IMO.

    Step rings are also recommended
     
  14. Paul Jenkin

    Paul Jenkin Member

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    I've used Cokin A and P series filters in the past as a result of not being able to afford better ones. They are 'okay' in my opinion but I don't like putting anything in front of a top quality lens that will reduce its inherent qualities. Cokin do Pro-series filters but I haven't tried these.

    For film, I now use Lee filters. They're a lot more expensive but their quality is second to none. They also offer bespoke filters. I have one which is a 3 stop (0.9) ND hard grad at the top and 81B warm up the bottom. This saves buying two filters.....

    I occasionally use filters on digital but, as CS3 and Nikon Capture NX offer such great system filtration / masking options, I prefer to shoot 'straight' using nothing more than a Marumi Digital Protect filter - more as a protection for the front element of my lenses.
     
  15. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    I'd agree with everything posted above!

    I used one or two Cokin filters quite some years ago (for one particular special effect I needed then). At that time they had an ENORMOUS range...seemed a bit of good marketing to seduce people into thinking they needed to buy every single kind. :wink:

    The mount is rather fiddly for everyday use particularly if, say you only wanted to leave a UV or yellow/green filter on the lens for protection. My own basic screw filters stay on the lenses all the time, and the camera and lens cases close with them on.

    I'm told that the Lee version of the filters are much superior, but priced accordingly (conversation with someone in the movie business).

    I tend to use either the camera manufacturers' filters, or, for a wider range, the Hoya ones. I have a couple of B&W which seem really top quality too.
     
  16. rthomas

    rthomas Subscriber

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    I had a Cokin P filter set once, with just a couple filters for black-and-white. I gave it away because it was a pain to use.

    The step-ring solution works for my larger lenses: I bought several useful (black-and white, warming, and soft-focus) Tiffen, Mamiya, and Sailwind filters in 77mm size, with rings to put them on 67mm, 62mm, and 52mm lenses. Those filters live in a single wallet, in a large LowePro backpack that can carry most of my gear.

    I also have a couple wallets full of 52mm Tiffens that I bought used from KEH for next to nothing. I've seen some of the warming filters on their site for less than a dollar! Those stay in the bag with my F4 since they fit most of my Nikon lenses.
     
  17. nicefor88

    nicefor88 Member

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    I'm not so much keen on filters, especially those giving colour effects. Taking one photograph with a colour filter is ok. The second will already look like a clone... if you see what I mean.
     
  18. With all due respect to budgetary constraints, your camera optics are something you shouldn't cheat. Make the extra stretch and purchase good-quality glass filters, eg. B+W, even though you may need a couple of sizes. Inferior plastics and glass can (and will) lessen image quality, no matter how good your current lens(es).
     
  19. winjeel

    winjeel Member

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    I use Cokin, and the only problem and complaint is with the ND and the sky, the ND tends to add a tinge of purple to the sky... at least on digital. I don't think I've had this trouble on film, though I haven't looked for it specifically. I use a Lee ND, otherwise all else is Cokin. I can't really compare Cokin and Lee, I haven't had the experience with Lee (other than that one ND I've got). However, I'd rather hard filters to the 'soft' Lee that I've got. I've only got one scratch in my filters, and it doesn't seem to affect any pictures. Not much else to report.
     
  20. Tim Boehm

    Tim Boehm Subscriber

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    B+W or Heliopan
     
  21. Bob F.

    Bob F. Member

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    It's not just the quality of the glass (though that is the primary consideration of course) but B+W, and I think Heliopan, use brass mounts rather than the more usual aluminium of the cheaper makes. Brass does not bind; ali can, and does. Worth considering, especially if stacking step-up/down rings.