Filters for large format cameras?

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by lewis-richards, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. lewis-richards

    lewis-richards Member

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    Hi, I'm quite new to large format and I have a question about filters, basically I've always been fond of Cokin filters so that's what I'm going to aim at getting. I have a bit of confusion of what ones to get though because there are 4 types, A,P,Z,X Which would be best suited to large format because I originally thought as long as the filter covers the lens it will work? On the Cokin website it does however state that the Z or X are ok.

    Is anyone using the P series filters on a large format camera, 4X5 size film?
     
  2. Venchka

    Venchka Member

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    Kinda depends on the lens, no? My most often used lenses for 4x5 have 46mm threads (1 Fuji) and 67mm threads (1 Fuji & 1 Nikkor). My Kodak Ektar 127mm lens uses slip on Series VI. I have an assortment of B+W & heliopan filters in 46mm & 67mm. Horses for courses.
     
  3. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I have a compendium shade that has a built in 3x3 filter holder, I can use it with any lens.
     
  4. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    I use the P series for both 4x5 and 8x10.
    juan
     
  5. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    I use P series as a standard. They are large enough for my largest lens, and then I use the adapter rings that I need for each lens.
     
  6. Monophoto

    Monophoto Member

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    I don't use filters extensively, but when I do, I used Cokin P.

    Both of my 4x5 lenses have a 67mm front thread, so one adapter ring, and one filter holder, is all I need.
     
  7. WetMogwai

    WetMogwai Member

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    I use the A filters. They are more than large enough for every lens I use in 4x5 and the 35mm and 120 cameras where it doesn't block the viewfinder. The only lens I use on my 4x5 right now is an old Calumet 6", which is one of the smallest lenses I have in any format. I had to use 2 step up rings just to get the smallest A filter holder ring on it.
     
  8. MarkL

    MarkL Subscriber

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    Hitech has a nice system for 100mm filters.
     
  9. ZoneVI

    ZoneVI Member

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    If you are scanning and editing your images in Photo Shop CS5, you can always choose to apply your filters during that process. This is something I am considering doing because the capability is there to do it after the fact and you work with layers you can apply different filters to different parts of the image. I am also new to large format but my process is to develop in a daylight tank and then make a quality scan and work from there.

    Jason
     
  10. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    Rick, might I ask what compendium you are using?
     
  11. Mal

    Mal Member

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    In relation to ZoneVI's comment... "If you are scanning and editing your images in Photo Shop CS5, you can always choose to apply your filters during that process."

    This may work with colour filters but I can't see it working with neutral density filters. A graduated ND filter helps to balance the exposure of the sky with the land (for example). If the sky is blown by correctly exposing the land you'll never get back the details in post production... Using ND filters to take longer exposures of waterfalls, etc is also something that would be hard to replicate in Photoshop...

    A filter kit is worth the research and investment for me...
     
  12. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Another comment along the same lines:
    Using Photo$hop to add color filtering after a black & white film photograph is exposed and and developed to change the contrast is about as useful as making a sandwich and sitting on it to add protein to the hair on ones head! :w00t:

    Steve
     
  13. ZoneVI

    ZoneVI Member

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    I think its only fair that I respond to the last two comments. First I do not think I said that the filters that can be used in post processing are the catch all end all just as filters used on a lens while creating an image are not the catch all end all.

    Either way, and no matter what method you use, there is no substitute for a properly exposed negative.

    The comments in regard to my post make me wonder if the individuals that posted them have ever attempted to apply filters to a scanned black and white negative when post processing in Photo Shop. It is possible to apply different filters to different parts of that negative through the use of layers. That is something that would be difficult to do with a traditional filter system.

    A blown out sky is a blown out sky. There is no disagreement there. You certainly can blow out parts of a scene whether you shoot film or digital. Yes you can always use a neutral density filter, or maybe the scene could have possibly been metered differently to begin with. I am not suggesting that traditional filters do not have a place, but I am saying there is some alternative that is applicable when post processing in photo shop. Its certainly not perfect, but then the process of taking the image isn't always perfect and neither is the wet dark room post processing. If it was we would have never needed the ability to bracket and use exposure compensation.

    Interestingly enough, I think there are plenty of photographers that certainly have some afterthoughts concerning images they have made and possibly filters they wish that had applied when exposing their negatives. All I have done as far as I can tell is suggest some alternative methodology to those that might be open minded enough to take an opportunity to explore it.

    Just as an example of how to apply a neutral density filter, I am adding a link for those who are interested. While it does not really apply to a blown out sky specifically, it does address the methodology with instruction for those who might be interested.

    http://www.turningturnip.co.uk/phot...2/adding-neutral-density-filter-in-photoshop/


    Also the same HDR method used for digital can be applied to scanned film. Its worth exploring.

    Jason
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 20, 2010