Filters, Lens Shades, and Hasselblad Lenses

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by JDW22, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. JDW22

    JDW22 Subscriber

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    As I noted in another thread, http://www.apug.org/forums/forum51/123708-hasselblad-500cm-what-am-i-missing.html, I purchased a 500CM and 80 F2.8 CF T* lens from KEH. It is scheduled to arrive Friday. As I intend to primarily shoot black and white film, I need to get myself set-up with some contrast filters and a lens shade. As a newbie to Hasselblad, I need some help deciding what filter/shade set-up to purchase. It is my understanding that my 80 CF lens takes the B60 series filter mount. As I see it, my options are as follows:

    1. Get a few B/W contrast filters that use the B60 mount. B&H show some expensive Heliopan that would work; however, I could only use them on that lens or another Hasselblad lens that uses the B60 mount.

    2. Get a step-up ring that goes from B60 to 67mm or 72mm or 77mm threads. Theoretically, this would allow me to use 67mm, 72mm, or 77mm contrast filters on other lenses - assuming I have lenses that can use those filter sizes.

    3. Get Lee filter holder/system and use the appropriate Lee filters.

    Maybe there are other options I'm missing, but this seems to cover the most popular I could find.

    I also have a question regarding the use of the standard Hasselblad rectangular lens shade or bellows-style lens shade with any of these filter arrangements. I think the standard Hasselblad lens shade would work with option #1 and I believe Lee offers a bellows-style shade that will work with their filter system. Hasselblad also offered (and I can get used) a bellows-style lens shade. I'm not sure how or if the Hasselblad bellows-style lens shade will work with options #1 or #2?

    Any comments, suggestions or help is sincerely appreciated.

    Thanks;

    Jeff
     
  2. Dr Croubie

    Dr Croubie Member

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    a) do you have other lenses that you might want to use with said filters? Are they hassy-bayonet or normal-screw?
    b) do you have any filters currently, bayonet or screw?
    c) what's your budget, and how easily do you get GAS?

    If you've already got some or the other, it's probably going to be cheaper to use what you've got and build up the set from there.
    If you're starting from scratch, the cheapest route would probably be going from hassy bayonet to regular-screw, and buying regular-screw filters that exist in every price-point from $5 to $500. It will also be easier to get cheap(er) nice-brand filters from fleabay in whatever size you need.
    Plus, if you want to later go to Lee for their very nice 4x6 Grad NDs, you can then get either a bayonet OR a screw thread to Lee adapter.

    I don't know about the hassy shades, unfortunately, but my guess is that they're bayonet-mount. Using step-up rings generally precludes the use of hoods on most of my other systems, so I'd be deciding on a hood system before filters (there's always cheap screw-in hoods that you can use if you get screw-filters available from fleabay but they're never as nice looking...)
     
  3. zeta3

    zeta3 Member

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    Are you a landscape photographer who needs a polarizer and red/orange contrast filters?

    Wait till you get the camera and have used it a bit before buying a filter collection. Also wait to see if you need a wider or telephoto lens to go with the standard and see what the thread is on that before deciding between bayonet and step up rings. You may probably want a second back too.
     
  4. Double Negative

    Double Negative Member

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    I went with option #2; a B60 -> 72mm (IIRC) ring/adapter. Most CF (and other?) lenses use this, so it works well. You can also use it to mount a filter holder (e.g. Cokin P or Z).
     
  5. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    The lens has two bayonet mounts one on the outside of the front ring, and the other on the inside. The standard hood mounts on the outside, while filters and most bay to screw adaptors I've seen mount on the inside.
    Depending on the adaptor, it may work with the standard hood, though you would probably need to mount the hood first then the adaptor, if you are using bayonet filters, then the hood will slip over them.

    I would only do the adaptor thing if you have other lenses that could use the filters you adapt to, otherwise I'd get bayonet filters to simplify the amount of stuff you need to carry around. They are easy to find used, in good condition, if you want to save some money.

    The bellows shade can be kind of ungainly, though the newest version folds which would be a nice feature.
    The nice thing about the bellows shade is that it can be used with any of the Hasselblad lenses with the use of the appropriate adaptor.
     
  6. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Go with option 1. I've walked in your shoes and this is what I've been happy with. Adapter rings might save a little money but htey aer a pain in the neck. You probably only need 2 or 3 filters so the price is not exhorbinant. The "standard Hasselblad" square lens hood work well with filters, whether B-60 or 67mm with adapter. I think the Hasselblad bellows type lens hood will also, but I don't use that so not 100% sure. Whatever you do... don't overthink the problem and try to be too creative in a solution. You'll only revert to one of the two "correct" answers. :smile:
     
  7. cheny03

    cheny03 Member

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    It looks like 67mm is too large for the lens hood. I'm wondering if B60->62mm adapter will fit into the lens hood.
     
  8. Chris Livsey

    Chris Livsey Member

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    The choice of the bellows shade is a tripod choice, can be hand held but ungainly. It does, the latest anyway, drop down whilst staying attached to change lens fitting filters/polariser and fits drop in filters. Especially useful for neutral grads where you can adjust the "horizon" position.
    You can stack 'blad filters. They bayonet onto the internal bayonet on the lens and the shade bayonets over that onto the external lens bayonet. (what a lot of bayonets).
    The polariser must be last, it does not carry a bayonet to allow a stack over it.
    Whilst you can mount other adapters etc I have always preferred to stay with original gear. The cost difference is usually minimal S/H and there is "something" (despite the Lunar) of having HASSELBLAD plastered over everything.

    You can of course go a bit too far :whistling:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 31, 2013
  9. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    If one is a filter stacker... that is the only justifcation I can think of for using 67mm (or whatever size you want) filters and an adapter ring.
     
  10. Chris Livsey

    Chris Livsey Member

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    My post edited, I had meant to say can be stacked but had sticky finger syndrome, now corrected, apologies.

    (note to self: read before sending)
     
  11. JDW22

    JDW22 Subscriber

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    Excellent comments; please keep them coming.

    I anticipate working exclusively with the 80mm Planar for the first 6 months to a year before even considering another piece of glass. I feel like I need to learn creative discipline and proficiency with the 500CM and 80 Planar before expanding my options. At least for the time being, it seems like options #1 might be my best choice. If I'm not changing focal lengths with different lenses, I likely won't need the versatility a bellows-style shade would provide. Option #1 is especially interesting to me considering that bdial states I can use a stock lens shade with a B60 filter attached. I imagine simple will mean less distractions as I learn Hasselblad and relearn film.
     
  12. Chris Livsey

    Chris Livsey Member

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    That is correct the shade fits over the filter(s) of course you loose some shade effect as the glass pushes out but one filter is never going to be a problem. I'm sure you will enjoy they are wonderful tools.
    You will need to push to 40mm glass before the B60 is too small and up to 350mm at the other end. the 60 is "universal". Shades the same only difference is the length. So a 50mm lens shade 40668 will it on a 150mm lens, it just won't be very effective.
     
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  13. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    in my opinion, filters are one of the feww weak points of the hasselblad system. they are all terribly expensive and the Hassy filter bayonet do not always stay put very securely. Iended up with a set of Tiffen filters in Hassy mount. the price was reasonable, and they are just as good as the pricy name-brand filters. the Hassy shades have a bajonet also and work perfectly with or without the filters.
     
  14. cariadus

    cariadus Member

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    I struggled with this conundrum when I first acquired a Hasselblad. I ruled out a proshade as being too big and unwieldy. I bought a Bay 50 (I have the older C lenses) to 55mm adaptor and used Cokin filters but I wasn't happy with that. In the end I bought Bay 50 Hasselblad filters and hoods for my 80mm and 150mm lenses. The hoods fit onto the filter and it's a much neater solution. If I want to use a filter other than what I've got in Hasselblad fit I can use the adapter and Cokin filter instead. I also use Cokin filters on my C Distagon 50mm, but that's another story...

    Hasselblad filters are very expensive, but if you're patient you can find reasonably priced ones on Ebay sometimes. The Milo and Aroma filters tend to be cheaper than Hasselblad filters - I don't know if there's much difference in quality. I bought a Chinese Widepan hood for my 80mm. It's plastic but quite sturdy and fits perfectly.
     
  15. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Invest in the B60 filters because they are generally higher quality and they will fit almost all the CF and newer lenses. That way one set of filters will work for all your future Hasselblad lens purchases.
     
  16. AGagnon

    AGagnon Subscriber

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    I use options 1 and 3:

    B60 for my most used filters (Y2 and Polarizer).

    Proshade and 4x4 Lee filters for more specialized uses (ND, R25...).

    With the Proshade, you can also use B60 and 4x4 at the same time.