Finest 'grained' colour film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by kram, Sep 10, 2007.

  1. kram

    kram Member

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    Hi, What is currently finest 'grained' (yes I know it's dye, but you know what I mean) colour film out there. Good old Kodak Ektar 25ASA, long gone, Konica did a 50ASA film, also long gone. So what currently is the finest film, Fuji Reala? The new(ish) 160ASA's from Kodak and Fuji? Surely there's is something more fine 'grained' than Reala (its been around abit), is there:confused:
     
  2. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    I assume you what a negaitive film not slide?
     
  3. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    I'd be guessing Velvia. Velvia 100 was finer than the old 50, I don't know about the new 50.
     
  4. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    The latest Portra films from Kodak (those who got optmimized for scanning) are really looking good in the grain dept. Ditto for the latest version of E100.
     
  5. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Is E100 finer than Kodachrome 64?
     
  6. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    For color neg, I'd guess Portra 160NC.
     
  7. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Reala was finer than the old Portras, and 100uc seemed to be in the same ball park. I've yet to use the new Portras and I nolonger have a darkroom to check.
     
  8. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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  9. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Probably. K64 is a trad grain emulsion; E100 is T-grained.

    In projection, it's hard to see because both films are fine and sharp; in scans E100G is finer grained but it's also because it was optimized for better scanning.
     
  10. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    David,

    It was interesting to see this old thread (guess I did my job and killed it! :wink: ).

    We're headed up for a quickie trip to Maine this coming weekend and I'm just assembling the kit. I'd already decided to "blow" some of the last of my Portra samples - packing a roll each of 400/NC in 35 and 120.

    Sadly, out of the 160 or I'd use it instead (I think - keeping an eye on the weather) - but I do want to get more familiar with this film.
     
  11. Dorian Gray

    Dorian Gray Member

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    I would think Astia 100F would be finer grained than any colour neg material, but I've never actually tested this. It certainly has extremely fine grain: noticeably finer than Velvia.
     
  12. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    As far as Fujichrome transparency films, Astia I believe has an RMS granularity of 7 and Veliva 100 has an RMS granularity of 8. I am not sure of the granularity of the new Velvia 50 (old used to be 9) or the new Provia 100 films. Also, I do not know the granularity of the available Ektachrome films.

    Rich
     
  13. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Most probably Ilford Micrographic. But deadslow and with a sensitivity cut-out...
     
  14. kram

    kram Member

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    Thanks of the response folks, the question relates to colour neg film. So there's no slow fine grin film out there? The new 160 films from Fuji and Kodak have got it sown up or have they?
     
  15. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Kram, the new 160 negative films from both Kodak and Fuji have incredibly fine grain. Go for them.
     
  16. kram

    kram Member

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    Michel - I am using them at the moment. I am pleased with them but I was wondering is there anything finer than them?
     
  17. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    In terms of available colour negative, my answer would be no.

    Some people have born-again experiences with secret stashes of Ektar 25, but I mean, for the price of uncovering such a trove in a worthwhile manner, moving up to 120 or LF is a better investment.

    I haven't yet been able to print 35mm 160 film on an 11x14, but I'm hoping to do so when I can find a suitable print drum. So far I do only 8x10 and I'm giddy with excitement.

    Slide films might also be extremely fine grained and sharp, but unless you plan on doing Ilfochromes, you're pretty much have to go digital.
     
  18. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    A while back, it was Fuji Astia, which was a hair finer grained than the old Velvia. I'm not sure how the new Velvia 50 fits in. In general, reversal films have finer grain than negative films of the same speed. But people make too much of an issue of grain. The grain in many of the current films is too small to be insignificant for enlargements less than 14X17. Even when the grain becomes visible, it usually does not detract from the picture. The way the film renders the colorrs and the scenic values is far more important.
     
  19. aldevo

    aldevo Member

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    The latest-generation Fuji Astia, I believe, has the lowest published RMS Granularity number. E100G is pretty much even with Fuji Provia where grain is concerned and Fuji states that Astia is finer-grained than Provia.

    Astia does not quite have the edge sharpness of Provia, E100G, or Velvia, however. It's contrast, color saturation are also lower.
     
  20. braxus

    braxus Member

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    Aside from slide film being finer grained then neg film, and neg film generally being sharper, I'd say Kodak 100UC and either Reala 100 or better yet Fuji 160S being the finest.
     
  21. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    They are already very fine, you'll just have to shoot a larger format to see less grain in your enlargements :wink: Fuji 160S is available through 8x10.

    I recently printed some 6x9cm 160s rated at 120 and the overall effect was quite a bit like slide in terms of saturation and smoothness. Not quite the same astonishing level of detail, though.