First Foray Into The Pinhole

Discussion in 'Pinhole Photography' started by Christopher Walrath, Aug 14, 2007.

  1. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

    Messages:
    7,114
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Location:
    In a darkroo
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Well, this is my first thread in this category. I have always wanted to get started in pinhole photog but was never motivated enough until I read the July 2007 Black and White Photography. On one of the front pages was an article in which a gentleman had taken matchboxes and atached two rolls (one full and one empty) of 35mm film to either side and light tighted it with electrical tape. So, I spent $11.28 tonight and purchased enough supplies to make three cameras and have already taken the first picture. The pinhole is about .1mm and the matchbox is about 10mm deep. So I am guessing my aperture at f100. I will get more precise at work tomorrow. So an indoor self portrait under diffuse incandescant light using 400 speed film with an aperture of f100 I am thinking, allowing for reciprocity of an exposure time of 1 minute. Well not wanting to chance sitting still for a minute, I went for thirty seconds. I'll see how it and others go. I will post photos of the camera and also the images made with it, provided they are any good.
     
  2. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

    Messages:
    7,114
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Location:
    In a darkroo
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Added a reuseable bent paper clip handle for winding on.
     
  3. Rich Ullsmith

    Rich Ullsmith Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,041
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    You are industrious! Can't wait to see. What film are you using?
     
  4. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

    Messages:
    7,114
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Location:
    In a darkroo
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    For now, just cheapy color from Food Lion, but I will be switching gears to some B&W ISO100.
     
  5. clogz

    clogz Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,842
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2002
    Location:
    Rotterdam, T
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Could you post a picture of the camera? I am very interested.

    Hans
     
  6. Rich Ullsmith

    Rich Ullsmith Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,041
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Chris, something that's cheap and available is Tmax 100. No reciprocity correction for up to several minutes, more than I have ever needed. Fuji Acros too, but I think it's pricier.
     
  7. eddie gunks

    eddie gunks Member

    Messages:
    1,159
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Location:
    Saugerties,
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    great work. i built one of those cameras. good fun. check out f295.org for more fun.

    eddie
     
  8. Removed Account

    Removed Account Member

    Messages:
    907
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Nanaimo, Bri
    Shooter:
    35mm
    How does one make such a small pinhole? I am thinking of making one of these today!

    - Justin
     
  9. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,899
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Location:
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You will find a bunch of information through links here. I think one of the better descriptions of a method I've used is found on this page.

    I use #400 or #600 wet-or-dry sandpaper wet for the final sanding. I wouldn't be surprised laser drilled commercial plates are better, but the homemade apertures certainly work.

    DaveT
     
  10. Marv

    Marv Member

    Messages:
    141
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2002
    Location:
    Eastern Iowa
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Just be careful, the lure of lensles imaging can be very.....seductive......but FUN. For sure let us see some images.
     
  11. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

    Messages:
    7,114
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Location:
    In a darkroo
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I used the tip of a small sewing needle. Aperture with the 11mm f/l is about f90 or so.
     
  12. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

    Messages:
    7,114
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Location:
    In a darkroo
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Oh, and to avoid tin foil rolling up inside the box as a result of the puncture, I rolled the needle back and forth in my fingers until it just finally pierced the foil.

    I'll post a pic as soon as my husbandly/fatherly duties dictate the opportunity.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 29, 2007
  13. eddie gunks

    eddie gunks Member

    Messages:
    1,159
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Location:
    Saugerties,
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    you can use small hobby drill too. i began using them with great success. google up the sizes. i forget off the top of my head.

    eddie
     
  14. Greg_E

    Greg_E Member

    Messages:
    775
    Joined:
    May 17, 2006
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    http://www.smallparts.com has number drills. The sizes are listed in a chart, and you will probably want a number higher than about #60. The higher the number, the smaller the hole.
     
  15. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,899
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Location:
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The smallest drill you are likely to find is a number 80 which is 0.0135 inches/0.3429 mm in diameter -- and pretty scary to work with! The other problem with drills is they may not leave a clean edge, especially unless you have some sort of high speed precision drill press to use them in. Many normal sized drill chucks can't even grip drills that small. I have used a pin vise chucked in a larger drill press but there's little sensitivity to tell how hard it's being loaded.

    In theory, pushing a bump into thin stock with a needle, then sanding in a circular pattern with extremely fine sandpaper can create a relatively clean hole with a knife edge, a sort of optimum optical situation. And of course, it is about as inexpensive as you can get.

    I used to have some of those very small drills (some in solid carbide even) for use on circuit boards, but most long ago went the way of tiny fragile things spinning at high speeds under less than ideal conditions.

    DaveT
     
  16. Greg_E

    Greg_E Member

    Messages:
    775
    Joined:
    May 17, 2006
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Small parts has expensive stepped versions of the number drills with a much larger shank. But much smaller than a #80 would be really difficult.