First Hasselblad

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by S.larsson, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. S.larsson

    S.larsson Member

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    Hi fellow APUG:ers!

    I have had my Yashica 124G for about 2 years now and am considering moving to Hasselblad since I'd like the ability to change lenses and enjoy the excellent Carl Zeiss optics! Unfortunately I'm not very familiar with the world of Hasselblad yet and so I'm reaching out to you, hoping you can advise me on a suitable setup that will allow me to continue my passion for many years to come!

    As I understand the 500 series only allows a shutter speed of 1/500th. Is this limiting at all?

    As most people I'm not made of money, but I will save the pennies until I can afford the right piece of equipment so in that sense money isn't everything. Ive seen there are quite a few 80mm Zeiss lenses, what would you recommend?

    Regards,

    Stephan

    Göteborg, Sweden
     
  2. tnabbott

    tnabbott Member

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    Hi and welcome.

    My advise would be to bypass the "excellent Carl Zeiss optics" which are overrated and get a Mamiya RZ kit.
     
  3. amsp

    amsp Member

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    Go for it, you'll love the Hassy. The 1/500 limit is not a big problem, unless you're trying to shoot with 800 ISO film at f/2.8 on a bright summer day. As far as which version to get, just get the latest one you can afford, they're all excellent but the later versions with rubber focusing rings are more comfortable IMO.
     
  4. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    1/500 is no problem.
    New parts are not available for the older C lens shutters.
    The newer lenses are a little more user friendly.
    There are many threads here that cover the differences and the pros and cons of the various versions.
    See if you can try one out at a store or photo show, or borrow one, and see how you like it.

    The Mamiyas are fine cameras, and have no appologies to make to Zeiss optically, but they are quite a lot bigger and heavier.
     
  5. pekelnik

    pekelnik Member

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    Yes, I would say that the principal trade-off is weight. Hasselblad is a very good option if you care about price, performance, and weight.

    Virtually all recent film photos in my photoblog are shot on a 500c/m.
     
  6. daleeman

    daleeman Subscriber

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    I really enjoy my 550 c/m and all but one of my lenses are CF style. (50, 80, 120 & 150) the 40mm is a T* and I just could not touch the CF version of that lens cost wise.

    Shooting landscapes and even people's portraits I never get very high in the speeds. Never really shooting above 400 asa film other than once or twice you should not have to worry about not having 1/1000. What you really have to be worried about is your wallet.

    Since you already are accustomed to looking down in a viewfinder you will enjoy the journey. Do consider a CLA after you do some initial tests, it may need it. Sometimes backs don't advance right after years of service or non service. Lenses drift in speeds for the same reason. A good CLA can last you 10 or more years of easy use, a year or three for heavy professional service. And I agree about the issues of older C and C T* lenses, parts are few and far between.

    Let us know when you get fully infected with the Hasselblad Virus.

    Lee
     
  7. S.larsson

    S.larsson Member

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    @tnabbott: Haha, I'd rather support a Swedish company since I'm half swedish myself :tongue:
     
  8. Too old to care

    Too old to care Subscriber

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    I moved from a Yashica TLR to Mamiya TLR about 40 years ago, and from Mamiya to a Hasselblad 501C last year. I have to ask myself why it took so long every time I use it. I love the 501, the way it feels, the quality of the camera and lens, and the photos seem special. I think you will be very happy. My suggestion is to find the best one you can afford and test it like others have said. Mine had seen little use, probably as a back-up camera for someone, but it still needed a few adjustments. Wayne
     
  9. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    What do you typically shoot? Sports, weddings, still life, portraits, landscapes?

    People can 'recommend' anything all day long, but until they have some idea of your shooting style or particular needs, it's all simply opinions.
     
  10. agfarapid

    agfarapid Subscriber

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    Hasselblad's are fun but very pricy and somewhat limited when compared to an RB or RZ. I have both (Hassy and an RB) and find that although heavier, the RB allows me closer focusing without the need of close up lenses or extension tubes. I also find that changing film on the RB is a lot less finicky than the Hasselblad. When you get the opportunity, try using the Hasselblad and an RB or even a C330 and see which one fits your personality and shooting style. All of our suggestions are helpful but won't mean a great deal unless you actually pick one up and play with it.
     
  11. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    Find a good, used 500c/m with an 80mm lens and a back. If you buy it at a reasonable price, you can sell it for about the same amount if you don't like it. As others said, buy the newer CF lenses. The older ones are fine, optically speaking, but parts for the shutters are no longer made. Then save you pennies for another back, another lens or two, and the inevitable servicing and repairs.

    Peter Gomena
     
  12. S.larsson

    S.larsson Member

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    Ah fair enough, I shoot mostly Landscapes/Cityscapes and Street/Docu photography.
     
  13. S.larsson

    S.larsson Member

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    @ Agfarapid, I know what a C330 is but what's an RB/RZ? Cheers
     
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  15. GKR1

    GKR1 Member

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    Who ever says get something else than the blad either has not owned one or has no clue. LOL They are work horses, keep their value and are in demand.

    Get the 501C. For landscapes and street its great. Just add the 50mm lens to your kit, stay with CF T* lenses causes they share the same bay 60mm for filters. 40mm and SWC could an be addition down the road.
     
  16. pekelnik

    pekelnik Member

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    By RB/RZ he means the Mamiya RB67 and RZ67. The RB67 is manual and RZ67 is electronic, but otherwise they are very similar cameras. They are very good in all aspects but weight.
     
  17. thegman

    thegman Member

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    For landscapes/cityscapes, Hasselblad is hard to beat. For street work, I'd probably be looking more at a Mamiya 6 or 7 though. I had a 503cx, fantastic on a tripod, but I'm unconvinced about using handheld.
     
  18. DanielStone

    DanielStone Member

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    Having *owned* an RB67 and RZ67 kits in the recent past, and now having chosen the Hasselblad, here's some pro's and cons from my POV.

    Positives(IMO) *for Hasselblad*
    Lighter in weight than the RB/RZ system
    Smaller footprint(size) than the RB/RZ
    No batteries(unless you have a motorized body, such as a 500ELX, 553elx, etc...). The RB67 is also fully mechanical
    Lenses are smaller(but not necessarily lighter)
    Lenses are slightly lower in contrast(IMO) than Mamiya glass. I shoot chromes, so this helps tame contrast a bit.
    Rentals are still available for lenses/bodies, etc.. in many major cities worldwide(if needed)

    Negatives(IMO) *For Hasselblad*
    Much more expensive(usually 1.5-2x more). Almost everything is this way pricing-wise.
    Smaller negative. Having a 6x7cm negative/chrome allows one the "ideal" format, and you can always crop it square in post/printing/scanning.

    Positives(IMO) *For Mamiya*
    Relatively inexpensive to build a nice system
    Cheaper accessories (cost-wise)
    Rentals are still available for lenses/bodies, etc.. in many major cities worldwide(if needed) (this is relating to the RZ lineup, not many places(if any) RENT RB67 equipment)
    Higher contrast lenses(good if you shoot lots of b/w and like more "bite" straight out of the film. This is from my experience.
    6x7 is the "ideal" format
    Interchangeable lenses(RB lenses work on both RB and RZ lenses, RZ only on RZ bodies)
    Bellows focusing(good for close-up w/o having to use supplementary extension rings most of the time)

    Negatives(IMO) *For Mamiya*
    -Heavier
    -Bulkier
    -Takes batteries(RZ67 line of bodies). Shooting in the field, and not having a fresh battery can be a real buzzkill for a landscaper(like myself). I'm speaking from experience here :wink:
    -Bellows focusing(good for close-up w/o having to use supplementary extension rings most of the time). Have you any experience with a view camera? Bellows extension means you'll have to do exposure adjustment if focusing closer than infinity. The scales on the side aren't very clear IMO.
    -10 shots/roll for 120 vs 12 for the Hasselblad(6x6). But you get the "ideal" format :wink:

    hope this might clear some things up? I'm sure there's other things, but pro's and con's are subjective, and vary from user to user. These are just my major ones for each system.

    -Dan
     
  19. T-grain

    T-grain Member

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    my "ideal" format is square, period. but that's me
    I have had a yashica TLR for years like you, then decided to get something more "serious"
    I considered a Hasselblad, too, but it just looked a bit overpriced, price/performance-wise. That's why I got a Rollei (6000 series) for a very reasonable price. Never looked back (actually now I have 2 of them, a 6003 and a 6008). yes, it's an electronic camera, but reliable as hell. i also do time exposures with it (15+ min), no problems so far with the battery etc. It is a bit bulkier than a basic Hassy, but I like it more.
    I know quite a few people using a Mamiya-nice camera at the half the cost of a Hassy/Rollei, but quite bulky, and I just don't like the 6x7 format :smile:
    but there is a problem with a Rollei camera-where I went (in a populated place), there were people staring at me (well, the camera)-probably it's not the right tool for candid shots :smile: but I try to consider this as a privilege: if a Hassy is considered a Mercedes in the camera world, then a Rollei should be a Bentley :smile:
     
  20. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    I thought it was the other way around? Mercedes are cheaper than Bentleys, therefore you'd be driving the C class... Right? LOL
     
  21. T-grain

    T-grain Member

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    well, not quite...the problem is that second-hand "Bentleys" are underpriced (luckily), but they come fully accessorized
    on the contrary the "Mercedes" hold price better, due to popularity-but if you want to get a fully equipped "Mercedes" it costs easily as much as a "standard Bentley" :smile:
    but I wouldn't be surprised if people spend more on a used C-class compared to a well-kept Bentley because they are afraid of maintenance :smile:

    anyway, I think we all should thank the majority of consumers/prosumers to have switched to d*****l, so the prices dropped dramatically, by an order of magnitude-medium format has never been so affordable
    I have 2 bodies, 3 lenses, a bunch of accessories: in the old good days that was a fortune (like a mid-high class car, say about 20 grand), but I have spent less than for a 5D MKII.....body only of course
     
  22. johnielvis

    johnielvis Member

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    your concern about 1/500--the yashica also has 1/500--if that limited you, then the hasselblad will limit you.

    they are well built and durable--just get one that hasn't seen 50 years of hard use--they DO wear with YEARS of use. don't skimp--they are actually a bargain in my eyes--you get what you pay for---they are "expensive" compared to others, but cheap compared to what you get...they are magnificent machines.
     
  23. agfarapid

    agfarapid Subscriber

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    As stated in subsequent posts, the Mamiya range of 6x7 cameras are great cameras, differentiated by manual, no battery req'd (RB 67) and the newer RZ 67 which has an electric shutter requiring a battery. For what it's worth, I currently own and use a Hasselblad 500C as well as the Mamiya RB 67, the C330 and the Mamiya 645 Super (a 6x4.5 format having interchangeable lenses, hoods and backs). I love and use them all and would be hard put to say "this is the best or worst". Each one of these have their advocates and all are superb instruments. You have to decide which one suits your particular style and pocket book.

    Good Luck!
     
  24. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    Sorry to disagree with Dan, but I don't think 6x7cm is the "ideal" format.

    I like 6x6 because you don't have to rotate it; it is what it is.

    If you're shooting MF chromes, you won't find slide mounts or a projector for 6x7, but they're readily available for 6x6.

    - Leigh
     
  25. Willie Jan

    Willie Jan Member

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    Recommendations.
    After years of experience with hassy i use now a 60mm, 120 macro and 250. All CF lenses. (double the size)
    Buying a 60 and a 80 has no great benefit. It only makes youre backpack heavier. I find the 80 to narrow. (50mm at 35mm camera format)
    The 60mm hassy is about 40mm in 35mm format, that is how we see the world.
    I use my set for macro work, nature and occasionly portraits. And of course i take it with me on holidays.

    For the 1/500. I never used it..
    I use fuji 100 film and tmax 400.
     
  26. Willie Jan

    Willie Jan Member

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    When i was in kopenhagen, i wanted to make a picture of the mermaid, but it was so crowded with japanese people that i put my hassy upside down above my head to get rid of the crowd...

    What i want to say is that there are a lot of tools that can be put onto the body to use it in a different way. No electronics involved, so no real problems that can not be solved in the future.
    Expensive? I don't thing to. It was expensive, until the digital age came up. Without this i probably could not have bought a hassy...