First packfilm polaroids ever!

Discussion in 'Instant Cameras, Backs and Film' started by EASmithV, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    So I loaded up my Colorpack II with the film that came in the mail today, and i'm more than pleased.

    I'm still working on getting my pulling it out at an even rate down, but it's looking good! Here are some images

    8058282296_17a29c4b8c_z.jpg 8058265051_9765d2bcc2_z.jpg 8058278019_0d7b8f4f1c_z.jpg

    I have to say, i'm blown away by the quality of even the humble little Colorpack II, especially with the way that FP3000B handles skin tones.

    I noticed that this process makes a bit of waste, which has goop on it... How toxic exactly is this goop? Is it something i should watch out for or just wipe off on my pants and keep shooting, just make sure i wash my hands later? I can't imagine it to be too bad, the box doesn't have a horrific warning on it... just a notice of high alkalinity... If people were actually using this in a practical situation, how likely were they really gonna run to a sink when they made an image... come on, it can't be that bad right?

    Also, how do you fix the negatives from FP3000B to make them printable?
     
  2. AgX

    AgX Member

    Messages:
    11,929
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Does Fujifilm call their instant material now "Polaroids" ?
     
  3. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

    Messages:
    751
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The goop is, as you said, an alkaline solution, one component of which is NaOH. I've never had any adverse reaction from touching it and quickly wiping it off; some people notice a slight tingling sensation. I usually peel from the side nearest the tab, and fold the negative in on itself to avoid touching the goop. The negatives from 3000B aren't printable; the best you can do is let them dry (5-15 minutes) and scan the (very fragile) emulsion layer.
     
  4. cramej

    cramej Subscriber

    Messages:
    203
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Keep the box from the film pack, tear off the flaps and put it in your pocket. After you peel, fold the 'tab' half over onto the 'negative' half and drop it in the box. It works great for the 99% of the time you don't have a trash can handy. The developer goop is a little nasty and may cause a minor chemical burn if left on the skin too long. Just try and only hold it by the edges. The 'negatives' from 3000b can't be cleared or fixed - they have a white base. You can, however, let them dry WITHOUT TOUCHING ANYTHING (they'll stick) and then scan but the image quality is far less than scanning the print.
     
  5. MichaelT72

    MichaelT72 Member

    Messages:
    23
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2011
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I gave my 30something son a Polaroid Countdown80 I picked up while back for a fiver. He put his digi away...he said his images are "awesome" and is having a lot of fun with this. His little son is fascinated by the "magic". He's been shooting the 100C. I told him about my stash of 100b which may have been a mistake.
     
  6. vdonovan

    vdonovan Subscriber

    Messages:
    504
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    Large Format
  7. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    does anyone have a good method for saving the negatives when shooting in the field?
     
  8. Heinz

    Heinz Subscriber

    Messages:
    93
    Joined:
    May 9, 2009
    Location:
    Dortmund, Ge
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  9. PolaGraph.com

    PolaGraph.com Member

    Messages:
    12
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Location:
    SF,CA,USA
    Shooter:
    Instant Films
    Bring a plastic benton lunch box ($1.5 at Daiso) or put the negs back to an empty pack for the most compact fit.