First photo test with X-ray film (blue sensitive)

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by PHOTOTONE, Jul 16, 2007.

  1. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    I just posted my first shot with some free sample X-ray film I got. High Speed Blue Sensitive. I actually overexposed it a bit, or overdeveloped it, as it is dense. There is also a "glow" around the highlights a bit, and of course the sky is washed out, due to the blue sensitivity. Kinda like the effect though. I will be posting more soon. I have uploaded the photo again to this post for convenience, but if you want to view all the details involved you should view the photo in my gallery here.
     

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  2. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    Phototone, that looks really good! Is this the CXS stuff?

    What EI did you expose at, and how did you develop?
     
  3. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Yes, it is the CXS stuff. I exposed based on an ISO of about 12, but I found this was a bit too low, now I am trying about ISO 30 to 50. I developed under a red safelight in HC-110b by inspection...developing time about 2.5 to 3 minutes on a hanger in a deep tank, lots of agitation. The film has a blue base tint, as most X-ray film does. Other than processing by inspection, the film was processed just as if it were regular film, with a 30 sec. stop bath and then 4 minutes in the rapid-fixer, then a 20 minute wash.
    The smallest size available is 8x10, so I had to cut down a few sheets under the red safelight to fit 5x7 holders for use with my favorite field camera.
     
  4. nze

    nze Member

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    Nice first shoot , you're closed to the good exposure. I think you may dilute your HC110 little more to get a longer dev time.
     
  5. DeBone 75

    DeBone 75 Member

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    If you do a search for x-ray film there are lots of companies that sell film under their own house name, but it still made buy the big three, just cheaper. $32.00 for a 100 sheet box. I have not tryed any yet as I still have about 160 sheets left of the Kodak I'm using. It expired in 1996 and stored under less than ideal conditions and it still looks good. My ISO is around 200. I have soom AGFA that I'm going to try. The Hospital I work at got a bad batch, some strange fogging on the sheets so they are just getting rid of it. So I got some just to try.
     
  6. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    I don't mind the short developing time. I use HC-110b in a 3.5 gallon deep tank, so for long life, I need the "B" dilution.
     
  7. nze

    nze Member

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    I use to develop my X ra film for photo use in Rodinal 1+50 and also in Pmk . But just prefer 5-6 min timing for my tray development.
     
  8. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Here is another example of a shot on X-ray film, from my recent free sample. I have ordered a box of 100 sheets so I will be shooting it more frequently.
     

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  9. Black Dog

    Black Dog Member

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    Nice! It's good to experiment, isn't it?
     
  10. rkmiec

    rkmiec Member

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    i hope you guys dont mind me asking,what is the purpose of using xray film.is it just another medium or is there a quality that is liked by you.
     
  11. dslater

    dslater Member

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    Yes - I was wondering the same thing - what does x-ray film give you over a standard ortho film?

    Dan
     
  12. DeBone 75

    DeBone 75 Member

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    I like to experiment, I like the look, I like the price. There is also a pretty wide variety of emulstions to pick from.
     
  13. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Firstly, it can give a different look than Ortho film, as many X-ray films are just "blue" sensitive, and Ortho film is sensitive to blue and green light.

    Secondly, it results in more money in my pocket...as 8x10 sheets of X-ray film are as little as 25 cents a piece in boxes of 100. I can do a whole lot of playing around at that price. I don't think "Ortho" litho film is that cheap.
     
  14. charleymeyer

    charleymeyer Subscriber

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    Also, there's a great variety of large unusual sizes, such as 24X30cm which I can use with my circa 1895 Lechner: I've just ordered some x-ray film for it.

    Charley
     

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  15. wclavey

    wclavey Member

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    Is there someone around who might be interested in splitting the cost of a box of 100 sheets of 8x10 who might also be willing to cut it down to 4x5? I was highly impressed with the driver wheels image PHOTOTONE posted in the gallery and I'd like to give it a try myself, although I do not have a darkroom with space to be able to do the cutting... I use a changing bag for loading film.
     
  16. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    All you need is a small room like a walk in closet, at night, with a small 7 or 15 watt red light bulb to see by, and a cheap paper cutter. But I don't suggest shooting any esoteric film such as X-ray or Ortho as you must process this yourself.
     
  17. wclavey

    wclavey Member

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    I process all my 4x5 film, but I use daylight tanks... I'm even starting E-6. I just load the film holders and developing reels in a changing bag. I suppose I will try it myself, then.
     
  18. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Just go to CXS online and get a free sample of any one of the films you want to use. It won't cost you anything, including postage. They send out samples of 5 sheets. Comes in a light-tight plastic bag in side a thick cardboard sleeve, just like photo paper does. Don't abuse the free sample thingy, just get a sample if you want to try it. Smallest size is 8x10.
     
  19. David H. Bebbington

    David H. Bebbington Inactive

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    No direct experience of use of X-ray film for pictorial work, but off the cuff I'd say
    a) the film is blue-sensitive only
    b) it has IIRC no anti-halation backing, since X-ray film is often exposed on both sides, by rays directly from the source and also (I believe) blue/white light bounced back onto the film by intensifying screens placed behind the film (this is the reason for the highlight "glow" mentioned) and
    c) its coating is thick, which may give an interesting diffusion effect.
    I imagine the film would work best with big sizes which are then contact-printed.

    Regards,

    David
     
  20. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    The train looks great!

    Not all xray film is double emulsion, but it isn't easy to identify which films aren't.