First Post and a gear question

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by synj00, Feb 16, 2006.

  1. synj00

    synj00 Member

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    Hello all! I'm glad to be here on the board. I've been lurking for a few days and am seriously interested in taking up medium format to supliment my digital camera and learn some darkroom technique instead of sitting in front of PS all day long. There is some SERIOUS good information here, and Im busy taking it all in.

    The question I had is this: I'm looking at building out a Hasselblad 503CM rig, well not looking, more like obsessing. But does this one rely on batteries to operate? Is there a modern medium format rig that doesnt take batteries? Sorry if its a newbie question, I was just interested in going the complete opposite direction from digital, manual everything, no light meter, no batteries, and getting a camera that would work at 30 below or something and not have to warm the batteries if you know what I mean.
     
  2. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    You might look at a TLR like the Mamiya c330, inexpensive, interchangeable lenses, no batteries! A good way to see if medium format fills the bill.
     
  3. Gibran

    Gibran Member

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    The Hasselblad 500 series, including the 503 is an all mechanical, precision camera made in that old world tradition of which few things are made today. It, along with the Twin Lens Rolleiflexes are the some of the oldest and best designed/made cameras still in production today. Actually, I think the TLR Rollei went out of production for a number of years during the 70's. The Hassy is one of the best used bargains going today and is a full system camera of which just about all bodies, backs, lenses and prisims for the past 40+ years are compatible. If you are patient, you can actually pick up a really nice 500CM or 501C complete with 80MM Planar lens and A12 back for between $500-$800 or so. If you want something a little cheaper, yet still reliable and capable of professional results, look no further than a simple Twin Lens Reflex Rolleicord 111 to V. It comes with either a Zeiss Tessar or Schneider Xenar 4 element lens of wonderful quality and can be had for betwen $100-$200. I use both the Hassys and the Rollei TLR and love them. No batteries required and just a joy to use.
     
  4. André E.C.

    André E.C. Member

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    At those extreme temperatures and if you opt for the Hasselblad (as I think you should:wink:), be extremely careful with your choice of optics, old synchro shutters from the C`s might struggle at those low values.

    Cheers

    André
     
  5. Sandeep

    Sandeep Member

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    The Mamiya RB67 with the giant 6x7 negative, great optics is also fully mechanical and offers the ingenious revolving back.
     
  6. Dracotype

    Dracotype Member

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    Any good quality TLR, as several have already suggested, would fit the bill. Less expensive than a Hassy, and plus you get a feel for it before you do get a Hassy. I don't know whether they work very well at low temperatures though. Leaf shutters might not do so well. Come to think of it, not many shutters would do well at those temps anyways :D. But do your own research. Only you can choose which camera you want.

    Drew
     
  7. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    A well-cleaned, unlubricated leaf shutter should have no problems at 30 below. Metal focal-plane shutters the same - I used a Pentax ME at -45 when I was in the army. It ate batteries, but exposures were fine. The main danger was the film cracking...