Fixer and Rapid Fixer? difference?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ezwriter, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. ezwriter

    ezwriter Member

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    Confused about diff between Kodak powder fixer I've been using and the Rapid Fixer liquid i have.
    I shoot Tmax 100 mostly , 120 and 35mm

    2- What does "Sticky:thread subject name" mean?

    ez
     
  2. Helinophoto

    Helinophoto Member

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    I am not sure about the Kodak Powder fixer, it's perhaps just a non-hardening powder fixer with fixing times from 5-10 minutes(?), while rapid fixer is less than 5 minutes.

    Usually, you'd use a hardening fixer for certain films (Efke, Foma), these types of fixers usually have a fixing time from 5-10 minutes, so using a regular non-hardening fixer which is "slow" seems a bit mute in my world.

    I would use the rapid fixer for TMax films.

    There may be differences in how many films you can fix before the fixer is exhausted as well, regarding "slow" fixers and rapid fixers, but I don't have an overview on that.

    2. Sticky threads are "glued" to the top of the forum head, so that they are easy to find, regular discussion-threads disappear downwards when they get older and other threads are created, sticky's stay on top. (usually these are important thread or thread that contain information about the most asked questions in a forum).
     
  3. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    Kodak Fixer is a powdered, hardening fixer using regular hypo, sodium thiosulphate. Films should be fixed for 5-10 minutes, the longer times for T-max films as a rule. It's been so long since I've used it for paper I don't remember the fixing times.

    Rapid Fixer is a faster acting fixer using amonium thiosulphate. Films are generally fixed for 2-4 minutes, again the longer times for t-grain films. It comes with the hardener in the second solution, the "part B" liquid, and can be mixed with or without it. I mix paper fix without the hardener and film fixer with it. Most films do not, technically, need the hardener and it does make washing take longer.
     
  4. Tom Harrington

    Tom Harrington Member

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    Good question, I've wondered the same thing. I've always just used either the Kodak powdered fixer or I used to use the Ilford liquid fixer. For film I just fix it for 10 minutes. For film then I use Orbit Bath to cut the washing time.
     
  5. Mahler_one

    Mahler_one Member

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    The quick answer is that rapid fixing agents are made with Ammonium Thiosulfate, and "regular hypo" is compounded from Sodium Thiosulfate. A complete and informative discussion of "fixers" and how such work (and should be used) can be found in the latest edition of Steve Anchell's "The Darkroom Cookbook". Many who continue to enjoy traditional darkroom processes will find the book to be invaluable in that all manner of developers, stop baths, fixers, toners, etc., etc. are discussed. If possible, I would recommend that you consider having a copy available as a reference. Additionally, on the Photographers Formulary site one can find carefully parsed instructions as to the use of their Rapid Fixers for both film and paper. Finally, on their site, Ilford has a complete discussion of their fixers and how such should be used. Best of luck.
     
  6. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    Also, just a reminder when using Tmax films - you need to change the fixer more often as these films exhausts the fixer faster. I would prefer using a rapid fixer in this particular case.
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    The powdered fixer is great to keep in storage, for those emergencies where you are out of your favourite Rapid Fixer, but just have to develop something.

    And the powdered fixers are much easier to ship.

    And a hardening fixer is an easy way to access hardener as a part of a print toning regime.