Fixer

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Graham.b, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. Graham.b

    Graham.b Member

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    Hello all, i am short on fixer and so of need for more. I have been wondering what about none hardening fixer, like Hypam. I have read that there is no need for hardening for B/W films or papers.
    Any thoughts on this or any other suggestions on another fixer, Hypam does the
    job for film and paper.

    Graham
     
  2. Paul Verizzo

    Paul Verizzo Member

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    Go for it. Hardening is generally a thing of the past. I've never hardened nuttin' and I've never had damage that wasn't appropriate to my carelessness.

    I recently came across a roll of TMY that had lived on a messy garage floor, kicked around, and generally abused. There were a few places where some kind of chemical damage had occurred, the very emulsion slipped around. I put this roll in a bowl with a dab of dish detergent, swished it around. (Emulsion flakes showed up!) Then into photo-flow, and dry. The bulk of the frames show absolutely no damage. Amazing!
     
  3. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    Go for it indeed. There is no need for a hardening fixer unless you're processing at very high temperatures, using really old fashioned soft films (think EFKE and even then there are folks who don't use hardeners with these and report no problems), or plan do do some reversal processing that uses sulfuric acid in one of the steps.
     
  4. Graham.b

    Graham.b Member

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    I have all ways used Kodak chems, for everything, so a move to Ilford would be a change, is there any difference. It is said that once you find a way stay with that.
    I have the same with film. Kodak all the way. I do have a mix of Ilford papers as well as Kentmere.
     
  5. Paul Verizzo

    Paul Verizzo Member

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    Carrying chemicals to the land of Ilford

    I commend you! Just on principle.

    I think one of the problems Kodak had was image of being dowdy and domestic. (I could add high prices, but that's another topic.) Back in the 80's a guy named Robert Ringer wrote "Looking out for Number One." One of his amusing and oh-so-true experiences is what he called "The Expert From Afar." He was paid big bucks to fly into other cities to lecture, but could he get a gig in his own? Hell, no.

    Kodak was too familiar and unexotic. When I was growing up I don't recall any foreign companies, at least of any heft. I could be wrong. It was Ansco, Dupont, and Kodak.
     
  6. Graham.b

    Graham.b Member

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    The order has gone in. Ilford warm tone and fix. Got to go with who supplies the most as a support, and as Ilford has taken over kentmere, as this is a paper i use a lot of, why not go for the chemicals as well.
     
  7. CBG

    CBG Member

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    Graham.b You can mix and match any of the basic B&W pantheon of chemicals with no regard for who makes what. If you wish to use Kodak this and Ilford that, and Ansco and Agfa and Orwo and Jessops the other... you will be fine. Just suit the chemicals to your needs.

    C