Focusing loupe power

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Michael R 1974, Aug 22, 2012.

  1. Michael R 1974

    Michael R 1974 Subscriber

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    Consensus on the appropriate power out there? 4x?

    In rebuilding my LF kit for some reason I forgot to put a focusing loupe on the list. The one I always used was 4x.

    Suggestions?
     
  2. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    4X always works for me too.
     
  3. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    8x or 4x
     
  4. Shawn Dougherty

    Shawn Dougherty Subscriber

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    I have an 8x and a 4x. I always use the 4x...
     
  5. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    I use a 10X Peak Model 2. I find it difficult to spot the grain of fine grained 120 film or sheet film with less magnifying power, but that could well be my limited eye sight.
     
  6. Shawn Dougherty

    Shawn Dougherty Subscriber

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    I guess I should specify, I use the 4x with the camera and the 8x when I'm looking at film.
     
  7. Michael R 1974

    Michael R 1974 Subscriber

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    Thomas - sorry I should have been clearer in the question - this is just for focusing the camera.

    But I agree the Peak grain magnifiers are the best under the enlarger.

    Thanks everyone. I think I'll stick with good old 4x on the ground glass.
     
  8. Shawn Dougherty

    Shawn Dougherty Subscriber

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    Michael,
    I seems when I'm using the 8x on the camera I keep seeing the texture of the ground glass which makes it harder for me to focus...
     
  9. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Subscriber

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    Something slightly different. I use a pair of 6x high-magnification eyeglasses for ground glass focusing. Also for inspection of smaller roll film negatives on the light table.

    These glasses are are intended for people with severe eye issues. But the upside is that they allow comfortable true binocular vision in a totally hands-free environment. Very useful under the darkcloth. And they are very inexpensive to replace should you lose or break them.

    Ken
     
  10. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Doh! :smile: I use a 4X on the ground glass of my 5x7.
     
  11. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    I've heard recommendations of 4x to 6x for ground glass focusing.

    The Toyo is 4.6x, which seems to be pretty close to ideal. It's also long, so my nose doesn't hit the GG. :D

    - Leigh
     
  12. Alan Gales

    Alan Gales Subscriber

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    My Toyo is 3.6x magnification. It was the last version that you could get. My nose doesn't hit the GG either and I have a big nose! :D
     
  13. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    OK. I have one new in the box and it does say 3.6x.

    My other three were purchased used, advertised as 4.6x, but I've never checked them.

    Thanks.

    - Leigh
     
  14. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    Shawn and I both use the Toyo 3.6 and like them a lot. They are a little hard to find since discontinued, but check eBay frequently and one may show up. I saw one once on the LF Forum, but it was gone before the person i told about it could buy it.

    John Powers
     
  15. Alan Gales

    Alan Gales Subscriber

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    I have read that Toyo made a 4x loupe that you could change the focus.
     
  16. dpurdy

    dpurdy Subscriber

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  17. Maris

    Maris Member

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    I have a selection of loupes and the one I use is decided by the final enlargement ratio of the photograph.

    For example if I'm enlarging 4x then I need at least a 5x loupe to have some focussing accuracy in reserve. If I'm doing a 8x10 contact then I don't need a loupe at all. The ground-glass is already showing me everything I will see in the final picture.
     
  18. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    I'm not sure how this would work. Do you limit yourself to a particular print size for a given negative?

    I frequently find myself doing multiple images from the same negative, usually crops or changing aspect ratio (8x10 v. 11x14 etc).

    - Leigh
     
  19. Maris

    Maris Member

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    Yes, I use only two sizes of photographic paper, the aspect ratios are known before I start, and all cropping is in-camera. Then I go out and deliberately choose subject matter that fits those sizes and shapes.
     
  20. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    OK.

    So what happens if you do a landscape-format print, then a magazine wants to use it for a cover (obviously portrait mode)?

    I've had that happen.

    I shot chromes for many decades, so I'm well-accustomed to cropping in-camera. But requirements change.

    - Leigh
     
  21. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    There are a few important variables to consider. What is your film format, in other words, just how
    big do you need to see the details? There's a significant difference between a 4x5 and 8x10 groundglass, for instance. Next, do you use a fresnel with the groundglass or not? (I don't - I hate
    them - but if you do, there is only so much detail you can realistically resolve with a higher power
    loupe). I have used GG loupes all the way from 4X to 10X, but generally prefer something mid-range
    for versatility. One of my favorites is the Horseman 7X loupe - a nice compromise in size and
    magnification. I presume it was actually made by Peak.