Force Expiring Film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by jimmybuzaid, Aug 2, 2013.

  1. jimmybuzaid

    jimmybuzaid Member

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    I want to force expire some film quickly. Don't worry it's not expensive film (Kodak Gold). Anybody know what's best I thought of sticking it through the dryer, or in the toaster oven. Anybody know what's best?
     
  2. illumiquest

    illumiquest Member

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    Microwave it.
     
  3. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Use a fire!

    Jeff
     
  4. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Don't know what is best, but here are a couple of other options that come to mind:

    Pull it out of the cassette and wind it back in. (Do it fast so it isn't totally fogged).

    Send through a checked luggage scanner at the airport.

    Feed it to your dog (or pet goat, if you have one) and use it after you retrieve it.
     
  6. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Oh... forget about the last idea. That would be "excreted", not "expired".
     
  7. illumiquest

    illumiquest Member

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    I second the goat idea
     
  8. Light Guru

    Light Guru Member

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    Or just buy some expired film on ebay.
     
  9. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Leave it in a hot car for a couple of days. Put it in your attic for a few days. Microwaving it will likely do nothing as the actual film is in a metal can. Faraday shielding will prevent the actual microwave energy to get to the film. Besides, there's very little water to actually heat up.

    You don't want it so hot that it'll melt though. So oven is out.
     
  10. Light Guru

    Light Guru Member

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    You are assuming the film is 35mm. The OP never said, for all we know it could be 120mm or sheet film.
     
  11. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    I'm don't really shoot expired film but my thinking is that you should pull the development or overexpose the film. Pulling I believe reduces contrast and color saturation and I would expect that to happen with expired film.

    But more importantly, what effect are you after? You can control the grain and contrast with pushing and pulling and if you want weird colors then cross-process.
     
  12. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    But he did say it is Kodak Gold.
     
  13. illumiquest

    illumiquest Member

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    You're also assuming we don't just want to see flames in a microwave and the aging of the film is of secondary concern...
     
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  15. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    Plenty of organic chemicals absorb microwaves and thus heat up.
     
  16. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Kodak GOLD (which OP has said) is a 35mm film. I *think* it was available in something else long time ago but those has aged all on its own. So I think I assumed right....
     
  17. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    It's also true, OP didn't exactly say how he wanted the film to "expire...".... Flame will certainly *expire* it! :D:D:blink:
     
  18. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    YES! Metal in certain length will also resonate with the microwave energy and dissipate as heat. But will film do THAT? I've "cooked" photographic paper once in microwave. It did absolutely nothing. I guess this calls for an experiment! Muahahaha.... (mad scientist cap on) I've exploded fish once in a microwave. Boy that was messy.... but I guess that's not related to this topic.
     
  19. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Why?
    Why?​
    Why?​
     
  20. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Maybe to avoid the high price of buying expired film on ebay? Or did you mean why explode fish in microwave ovens?
     
  21. kevs

    kevs Member

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    Put it in your car's glove box, a greenhouse, on a hot windowsill or a heater/radiator/your central heating boiler for a few months.
     
  22. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    I can sell you some expired fugi Superia 400
    It was garish the last time I shot it but I think thats the way it's supposed to be.
     
  23. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    Folks- we're talking about Kodak GOLD here... that stuff was designed to basically never die - it's the zombie of 35mm roll film. Kodak engineers made it so it would produce useable images after sitting in the glove box for a year, or capturing three successive Christmases before being processed. So it would take a LOT to get it to go bad. Buy some in winter-time and store it in the furnace room over the winter, ideally next to or on top of a gas or oil furnace. I don't think an electric heat pump is going to cut it. Maybe put it in a Ziploc bag, making sure the bag is watertight, and then boil it on the stove until the pot runs dry.
     
  24. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    There's no such thing as 120mm roll film... Hehe




    Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  25. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Also, we're was the OP the last 2 months when I was selling all my expired gold film haha!

    I have 2 rolls left, do you want to compare my actual expired gold to your experimented fake expired?

    Also, flying camera, my Kodak gold looked awful, I don't think it's as much a zombie as you think.


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  26. George Papantoniou

    George Papantoniou Member

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    I've tried to "harm" different photographic materials (film, paper) in the past in order to get the "expired" or "old" look on the picture, sometimes with visible results. There were times though, that the manipulation (heating, scratching, boiling etc) had no visible result at all. It depends on the type of material and (of course) the way someone tries to harm it... in the end, I didn't really succeed to end up with an infallible method of producing such effects...