Forgot Temperature!

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by HumbleP, Oct 14, 2012.

  1. HumbleP

    HumbleP Member

    Messages:
    81
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney, Aust
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Hi,
    Beginner here. Just processed my first few rolls.
    I've just finished fixing the latest roll when I realised I'd made a very stupid mistake in forgetting to get the temperature right. :blink:
    I realised just as I was finishing off the fixing. Checked the temp and I'm about 18.5 degrees, 1.5 below recommended. So it occurred to me that I'm approx 1min short of correct development time. My question is, before I open and hang to dry is it possible to repeat the whole process ie add developer for 1minute, stop & fix again? If so how long should I stop & fix for?

    Thanks
     
  2. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

    Messages:
    2,132
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Location:
    NYC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Once it's fixed that's pretty much it besides using an intensifier. Give it a good wash and don't worry. My guess is that it's totally fine and useable.
     
  3. hdeyong

    hdeyong Member

    Messages:
    324
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    Location:
    Central Cana
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I agree. B&W is pretty forgiving. I'd bet they'll print pretty good.
     
  4. Rafal Lukawiecki

    Rafal Lukawiecki Subscriber

    Messages:
    810
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Location:
    Co. Wicklow,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If you have already fixed this negative, you cannot do what you are thinking of, that is develop it again in a normal way, because the silver halides either have already been reduced to metallic silver by the first developer, or removed altogether by the fixer. However, your film will be printable, as long as you have exposed it more-or-less correctly. What you will find, though, is that it's contrast is likely to be a bit lower, and you may need to print it using a higher grade of paper, like grade 3 or more, even if you have photographed normal contrast scenes. You may have also lost a little shadow detail for good. If contrast is low, you could correct it, quite easily, by intensifying this film using a Selenium toner, such as Kodak's KRST, but don't do this until you have dried and inspected this film.

    As a matter of fact, developing a film for less than usual is a commonly used technique for contrast reduction, and it is a part of the Zone System. A 15% development time reduction will yield a slight contrast decrease with some films, like HP5+, and a larger one with others, like TMax, but it also depends on the developer you have used.

    Good luck, enjoy your images.
     
  5. HumbleP

    HumbleP Member

    Messages:
    81
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney, Aust
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Thanks all for the responses. And so handy it was so rapid. I fixed the neg and let it sit. Typed my question and hit refresh a few minutes later, got my answer, quick photoflo and the neg looks nice and chunky :D

    I suspected there was a clear chemical reason why it might be a bad idea!
     
  6. HumbleP

    HumbleP Member

    Messages:
    81
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney, Aust
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Also that's great information. Reminds me how little I know which is what I love about photography
     
  7. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,066
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    It's too late for this roll but if you measure the temperature at the start and the end of the development, if it has dropped a bit, you can increase the time slightly to compensate.

    Not after fixing though. And if you were worried that the fix temperature was too low rather than development, stop worrying!


    Steve.