Forte Polywarmtone advice

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by MSchuler, Aug 7, 2013.

  1. MSchuler

    MSchuler Subscriber

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    I have a package of 10 sheets of Forte Polywarmtone FB Plus (16x20/semi-matte) that I bought on a whim a few years ago but never got around to using. I'm trying to identify a project to use it on and would like to make the most of my limited supply by avoiding unnecessary experimentation. My intent is to do smaller prints (8x10 or smaller) to stretch my stock.

    Does anyone want to opine on the following questions?

    1) Preferable paper developers? I typically use D-72 1+2 mixed from scratch and just started to use Formulary 130 1+1. However, I have chemicals on hand to mix up most of the developers in the Darkroom cookbook.

    2) Comparison to other papers? I have been printing on MGWT quite a bit recently and would be interested in knowing how Polywarmtone compares.

    3) Toning preferences? I typically tone for 3-5 minutes in KRST 1+9 to get rid of any green tone and increase Dmax, but occasionally do some toning in gold and/or thiocarbamide.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. ath

    ath Member

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    I can only comment on 2 and 3.
    2: Polywarmtone doesn't compare. It's unique.
    3: Polywarmtone tones like hell compared to other papers. Maybe variotone (designed for toning) comes close.
     
  3. faustotesta

    faustotesta Member

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    Alessio6x6.jpg It used to be my favourite paper. Unfortunately i'm not a fine art printer. I developed it with Ilford multigrade developer and the results were ok.
     
  4. faustotesta

    faustotesta Member

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    the image enclosed has been printed on the forte polywarmtone
     
  5. alfiollett

    alfiollett Member

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    can't comment on 1 and 2, but i can recommend toning in selenium, it's absolutely beautiful. be careful though not to overdo it! you're lucky to have a package...
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    It's my main paper, I still have quite a bit left from the last production run.

    I make up my own ID-78 which was an Ilford powdered PQ warmtone developer pre-dating Ilford Multigrade Warmtone by quite a few years. Ilford Multigrade Warmtone developer or Agfa Neutol WA give similar results.

    It's a very flexible paper, you can vary the warmth significantly with exposure & development time, I keep development to a minimum to maximise warmth.

    Ian
     
  7. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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    lith print it!!
     
  8. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    It tones very well with all toners, but borderline violently. It reacts very strongly to all sorts of toners.

    Moersch carbon toner is my favorite for this paper. You don't have to bleach, it acts like a direct toner. Gives a very beautiful tonality and slight warm character to the print, but without being gaudy.
    I've also tried it with Moersch MT-3 variable sulfide toner, and with the bleach diluted 1+100, bleached for only 20 seconds, and re-developed at the darkest red setting, it takes care of a lot of the green quality you seek to eliminate. If you follow up with Selenium it can almost explode in color before your eyes, so be careful if you duo-tone.
    Regular sepia toner works like MT-3 above, but at the most yellow setting, and can look great, but is not for everything. Definitely not a preference of mine, but others may like it.
    Selenium - be careful here. Work with very dilute toner to begin.

    Have fun! It's wonderful paper.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2013
  9. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

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    Ansco 130 is my favorite developer for PWT. I tone it in KRST 1+19 for just a minute or two. I don't really want to see the print change tone, as it's perfect with just the developer.
     
  10. Richard Jepsen

    Richard Jepsen Member

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    Don't be surprised if its fogged. Been a long time since it was produced.
     
  11. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    The last production runs weren't that long ago, all my paper's fine.

    Ian
     
  12. MSchuler

    MSchuler Subscriber

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    Thanks to all for all of the advice and input. I did some introductory comparisons to MGWT using step wedges and the paper appears to be fine as far as fog goes.
     
  13. An Le-qun

    An Le-qun Member

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  14. clayne

    clayne Member

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    Yes, watch how much you selenium tone it. PWT has a tendency to go evil red if you over do it (which means it's quite reactive to Se toning as Se is red in nature).
     
  15. kapro

    kapro Member

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    In 2007. I still have couple of hundreds sheets. Lucky me.
     
  16. baachitraka

    baachitraka Subscriber

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    I have more than 80 sheets in 18x24cm, and it shines in Moersch SE5 lith.
     
  17. frotog

    frotog Member

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    I have PWT from the '90's that does not show the slightest hint of fog. No OB's or incorporated dev. in this excellent paper so should be good for even longer yet.
     
  18. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

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    Sadly miss Forte papers...
     
  19. shgavman

    shgavman Member

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    Hey, hope I'm not highjacking this thread. I just thought it was relevant. I'm new to the darkroom. I found a pack of forte polywarmtone in the University darkroom and I'm interested to know why people speak so highly of it.

    I read people talking about toning in some other chemicals like KRST?? What are they referring to?

    I needed exposure times of about 70 seconds for prints I made recently f11, 80mm lens. I'm wondering if this is normal?

    A page that came in the box gave some kind of correction factors but I'm not sure how to apply this.

    Any advice on how I should be taking advantage of this paper would be appreciated.
     
  20. LarsAC

    LarsAC Member

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  21. ChuckP

    ChuckP Subscriber

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    Your exposure time is pretty normal. It's a very slow paper. I use a Zone VI Compensating Metronome and it's hell to count those beeps. Try it compared to Ilford MGWT and see what you think. Use a negative that needs about a grade 2-3 as the Warmtone doesn't have the contrast range of the Ilford. Problem will be if you like it a lot your only option is trying to buy old paper.