Fotospeed Vanadium Yellow toner...

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by tim_walls, Dec 12, 2007.

  1. tim_walls

    tim_walls Member

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    ...Good Lord, that's not a toner, it's a bleach!


    I've just spent an enjoyable hour playing with some of the Fotospeed toners I've had lying around for ages and not done anything with, using a selection of identical 'normally exposed' prints on Kentmere Bromide paper.

    The Vanadium Yellow is more like a bleach than a toner - should I heavily overexpose prints to use this toner? I managed to create some very cool psychedelic solarisation effects split toning with the 'yellow' followed by blue, but not a lot of cop actually getting a decent yellow tone. (I haven't tried the Titanium Yellow yet, which I suspect behaves better.)

    (Anyone got experience of Bromide paper & these toners generally?)
     
  2. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I haven't tried Vanadium toner. But Titanium toner can give very nice orange tones too - depending on the paper, concentration, time, and luck.

    Anyway a nice solid yellow tone looks a lot lighter than a nice solid black! Try looking at the toned print through a dark blue filter?
     
  3. tim_walls

    tim_walls Member

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    Might try the filter idea - good thinking; they're drying at the moment so not looked too closely, but it looks to me like the highlights have disappeared entirely, rather than turning yellow!

    It was the speed which surprised me as much as anything else - the print disappeared before my eyes in literally seconds...
     
  4. tim rudman

    tim rudman Member

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    Tim,
    both the vanadium and titanium yellow toners give loss of density, which becomes greater loss the longer the toning continues. The vanadium is a brighter yellow than the titanium and probably gives more density loss. It's colour is not fully apparent until the wash though, when it becomes more obvious. Its main value is in the solarization effects however. This becomes apparent with multiple toning with the other metal ferrocyanide toners (blue, copper etc). fairly light vanadium toning is all you may need as a first bath.

    For yellow and yellow/brown tones use the titanium in preference to the vanadium. It gives nice colours but again some density loss. try a half stop over exposure for either of these yellows as a starting point. You might need more - say 1 stop - for vanadium.

    Tim
     
  5. tim_walls

    tim_walls Member

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    Thanks for the info Tim, much appreciated. The solarisation effects which you get with the following with the blue toner are definitely quite cool - I think I'll come back to that! My intention was actually to get a green tone - I think I'll try again this weekend with titanium :smile:.
     
  6. tim rudman

    tim rudman Member

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    Titanium and blue is the best way I know to a whole palette of greens Tim (other than chromgenic toners of course, which use colour couplers and dyes and give any colour)

    Tim