FR Adjustable Tank - Help Appreciated

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Fotoguy20d, Jul 24, 2008.

  1. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    I just got this FR adjustable tank in the mail last night. I get the basic idea of it, and I think I see how it forms light traps so I can use it in daylight and I'll figure out where to put the sides for the various formats. But, I don't understand why the one corner is square and why the diagonally opposite corner has that little protrusion on the outside. I thought it would be a spout for emptying but I didn't see a hole all the way through (maybe I missed it?) Anybody have instructions for this thing? How much liquid do I need for the various sizes? Best method for agitation to get even development (since I obviously can't invert it)?

    Thanks,
    Dan

    PS Sorry for the lousy photos but they're the sellers, and besides, you probably already know all about this contraption.
     

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  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    It's the outlet where you pour out the spent developer, like the lip on a jug.

    Ian
     
  3. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    Didn't look like there was a path for drainage there - I need to look closer. So the opposite corner protrusion is a vent for pressure relief?

    Dan
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    I guess so. I have a tank in the UK that I've not used yet, I bought it because my Jobo's aren't adjustable and I want to process 9x12's. The corner's identical.

    Ian
     
  5. r-brian

    r-brian Member

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    The square corner with the lip is the spout. The opposite corner with the protusion is an air vent to allow air in as you pour the chemicals in and out.

    For what it's worth, I have 2 of these tanks. Had them for years. Got them with in a package deal with a bunch of other stuff. After using them a couple of times when first getting into 4x5, I found they almoxt impossible to use and get good results. Gave up shooting 4x5 for a few years. Now use mostly the Combi Tank system. They work much better. Also have a JOBO tank but haven't used it yet. I figured the JOBO would be better if I only had a couple of sheets to develop.

    As far as agitation with the FR tank, when I used it, all I could do was some gentle side by side rocking. I tried to rock it parallel with the film sheets, not across them so as not to knock them out of the tracks.

    Wait until you you fill this tank up with 52 oz of developer. Another reason to not use it.
     
  6. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Subscriber

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    I may have found a better use for these tanks. Mine is a Doran (I think) - basically identical.

    I first drilled the bottom with a grid of small holes, taking care to miss any of the internal structural areas. I then drilled an entry hole in one vertical side, and a similar hole directly through the bottom, but away from the grid holes. After that I epoxied a quarter-inch sheet of plexiglass to the bottom, which on my tank left a sealed, internal void beneath the grid holes.

    All that remained was to epoxy small hose connections into each entry hole and connect the internal holes with a small tube. The external entry hole connects to a hose with a standard garden thread fitting which takes tempered water from my faucet.

    The water passes through the vertical side entry to the inside. From there it carries down through the small connecting tube into the bottom void. It then pools and wells up through the grid holes and overflows from the top, thus making this an excellent sheet film washer. Sort of like the Wat-Air units, but without the air (bubbles). And since it overflows, if the water supply should ever be interrupted, it simply sits there full until I notice. It'll hold ten 4x5 (or smaller) sheets. (I lost two sheet positions to that internal connecting tube.)

    Since I was given the tank for free, I don't think I even spent US$5.00 total on the project, plus one Saturday afternoon.

    Ken