Framing / mat cutting for a print with dirty border

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by tkamiya, Oct 31, 2011.

  1. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Prints made with filed out carrier....

    How are these prints usually framed? The only way I've seen so far is with no matting and glass directly touching the print. I really don't want to do it that way. I could use spacers but then if the print or print on mount board buckles even a little, it would touch the glass.

    My usual method is float mounting with about 3/4" all the way around or mat cut so that it cleanly shows the image only. I don't think the former method would look good with dirty borders and the latter defeats the purpose of using filed carrier entirely.
     
  2. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    I wouldn't have emulsion touching glass. Some images work well with the film border showing and some hand coated such as pt/pd with brush strokes visible. I prefer a cover mat and while not having a filed out negative carrier, if the print is dry mounted and signed on the board I use a window that is equal on the top and sides and longer on the bottom and allows the signature to show. I have gotten away from dry mounting as much as possible (if something happens to the board so goes the print) and sign on the back of the print and mount with archival corners. Those I have the window flush with the image. The pt/pd prints I do both ways depending on the image and some I mask so there are no brush strokes.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  3. degruyl

    degruyl Member

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    You can mount it with the window larger than the paper, or you can use a shadow-box frame.
     
  4. ROL

    ROL Member

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    It isn't clear to me what you're asking, but if the question is how one might hide untidy borders, and this is hasn't already been addressed by composing on the paper itself, one can overmat directly into the printed area, redefining its composition.
     
  5. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    No... my question is exactly backwards.

    I have a print with dirty borders. I want to show the border. How can I BEST present it in a frame? How would I mat this to look good and keep it off the glass? (or matting dirty border print is something not done?)
     
  6. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    Use an overmat with a window showing the dirty border plus some of the unexposed paper. Take a piece of mat board and cut two "L's" you can move them around the print to see the effect and how much extra paper you want to show. Measure the amount so you will know what size window is best and for that matter if you want to change your mind. Keep the "L's" to use when the occasion arises again. This way you won't waste boards by cutting the wrong size window or how you want to present a print.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  7. George Collier

    George Collier Member

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    I'm with Jeffrey here - I would try overmatting, and reveal at least an inch to several inches of paper. (depending on the size of the image and the frame.) Just keep trying different proportions till it looks right.
    Maybe Mark, of Frame Destination, a sponsor of APUG, will weigh in here.
     
  8. ROL

    ROL Member

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    Sorry, got it. But overmatting, even if for not cutting into the printed region, is still probably the best solution.
     
  9. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Hi tkamiya,

    Try a double overmat with a white mat board outside and a black (with black core) mat board inside opening to show the dirty border and some unexposed paper. Show extra beneath the print so the signature/caption shows. I have a monoprint by my mom that's matted this way and it is stunning.
     
  10. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Bill,

    Thank you for the double matting idea. I played around with it and so happens gray inner mat and white outer mat works very well because the photograph is split toned. The gray inner mat picks up the tone/color of the subject's clothing. (it's a gentle portrait of a mother holding her baby) It also made an interesting repeat of colors. Strangely enough, it looked the best when I didn't leave too much whites outside of the dirty border..... I didn't expect that.

    Thanks everybody, too, for ideas.