framing photos with or without glass

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by phelger, Oct 26, 2010.

  1. phelger

    phelger Subscriber

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    hi there,
    I'm preparing a show of some photos, 30 x 40cm, and find that frames with glass can be disastrous because of the reflexions. But without glass the prints are vulnerable, of course. How do you present your prints?
    peter
     
  2. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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  3. TSSPro

    TSSPro Member

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    I've noticed that a lot of galleries wont accept glass, but prefer or require plexie. Its lighter and sometimes cheaper, but it will scratch if you even look at it too hard.
    All the best
     
  4. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    I don't use glass or anything else to frame my pictures because of the reflections, but I've never shown them in a gallery. I'm curious as to what vulnerabilities you think they might have aside from sunlight and UV, neither of which should be a problem in a gallery.
     
  5. fdi

    fdi Advertiser Advertiser

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    Short term you also have to worry about finger prints. Long term you have to worry about atmospheric contaminants. No glazing at all is the least expensive option and no glazing reflections but if you are using a gloss or semi-gloss paper then you will still have print reflections.

    My favorite choice is regular acrylic with proper gallery lighting. Acrylic wont break during transport and it does not have a green tint. With proper lighting there are little reflections. The light should be above the image shining down so that reflection is only sean if you sit in chair so that your eyes are below the image looking up. This page has photos of images that framed with acrylic except for the canvas floaters: Picture Frame Gallery. In this case it is studio lighting with lights on both sides of the picture frame so there are no reflections when viewing the picture straight on.

    The next least expensive option is non-glare acrylic or non-glare glass. These products have an etched surface to reduce reflections. The drawback is that they will also slightly reduce sharpness. Poor quality versions of this product will give the image a matted look which I consider completely unacceptable. High quality versions are difficult to notice the difference in sharpness unless you do an A/B test.

    The last option is anti-glare acrylic or glass such as TruVue Musuem glass. The drawback with this product is that it is very expensive and will probably cost more than all the other framing components combined.


     
  6. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    If you are presenting glossy prints you will have the same problem with or without glass, but glass will protect the prints. I would try to work with the gallery and try to either adjust the placement of the prints or the lighting for maximum effect. You know you could also use the reflections off the glass to your advantage and set the photos on the wall in a way that allows you to only view one at a time so that your presentation of your are becomes part of the art and you draw people in by forcing them to stand in the place you want them in order to view the photo.
     
  7. Smudger

    Smudger Member

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    I have exactly the same quandary :surprised:nce you have spent fabulous sums on the print,toning,mounting etc,etc ,equally fabulous amounts on glass/plexi,at the end of which a less-than perfect light placement can destroy your visual effect and make a lovely image unremarkable to the viewer.
    Stuff that : I am going to buff my prints with Renaissance Wax,present them unglassed,and let the buyer take the weight for any subsequent glazing/framing they may feel is needed.
     
  8. phelger

    phelger Subscriber

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    thanks for your comments. I've now hung thirty photos in a gallery, most of them without glass but it is true when the paper is glossy that gives same reflexions as glass. However, a few of them are printed on mat paper and that is THE solution. I'll do that in the future
    peter
     
  9. TSSPro

    TSSPro Member

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    The Columbia Museum of Art, in Columbia, SC, didn't do a good job of lighting the AA show they hosted this year. They were underlit and really required the viewer to strain to pick up on all the nuances of the prints. Lighting is crucial.
     
  10. Jim Fitzgerald

    Jim Fitzgerald Member

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    I present all of my carbon prints without any glazing at all. Even non glare kills the image,IMHO.

    Jim
     
  11. archer

    archer Member

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    I agree with Jim Fitzgerald. I never glaze any work for exhibition, as I believe nothing should be placed between the work and the viewer. If absolutely needed for protection from airborne contaminants, I would prefer an archival lacquer or varnish as the least intrusive. Recently I've seen some of my work that was lacquered over 40yrs ago and it looks as fresh as the day I printed it.
    Denise Libby