Freeze or refridgerate film?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by aprilshowers01, Jun 7, 2009.

  1. aprilshowers01

    aprilshowers01 Member

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2009
    Location:
    New York
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I understand the need for keeping film cool, however, I know some people that keep film in their refridgerator and others keep film in their freezer. Which is better and why?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 7, 2009
  2. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The colder the storage, the slower the changes in the film characteristics. The same applies to paper as well.
     
  3. ozphoto

    ozphoto Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,313
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Location:
    Bangkok, Tha
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I keep the film I'll be using in the near future (a few weeks or couple of months) in the fridge; that which I'm going to use at a much later date in the freezer.

    Regardless of how you store it, you will need to remember to allow it to warm up; if I'm looking to use some from the freezer, I take out the day before, the stuff in the fridge a few hours before use.

    - Nanette
     
  4. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

    Messages:
    20,438
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I keep it in the freezer.

    Steve
     
  5. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    ɹǝpunuʍop.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Professional emulsions area released to market at close to ideal colour balance with the expectation they will be consumed a lot sooner than, for instance, consumer emulsions, which are manufactured with a lot more allowance for shelf-life and are quite good even if they are past their expiry date. These films are often left in cameras for anything from a month to a year, so age slowly.

    From early experience, Velvia / Provia that has expired and/or stored improperly will be casted with a noticeable change to anti-halation characteristics and loss of speed. If prompt exposure and processing is the norm, then only normal refrigeration is required. For me, film bought in bulk joins the rest of the film (both exposed and unexposed Velvia, Provia and Delta 100) in the freezer at –20°c. Film stored like this must be allowed to "warm up" prior to use for 6 hours before loading to prevent condensation. When travelling, a small 'esky' (Australian for icebox!) with ice bricks is fine, but this is only necessary in hot environments over extended periods.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 7, 2009
  6. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

    Messages:
    7,114
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Location:
    In a darkroo
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    I keep it in the kithe cupboard. I don't have any cold space for storage but I have not had any problems as it is kept 68 in the house most of the time.
     
  7. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

    Messages:
    2,223
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    Regina, SK,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Short answer: Freezing is better for the film (it degrades more slowly) but more inconvenient (it takes longer for the film to warm up to be usable for shooting).

    I freeze most to all of my film. If I know I will be shooting a lot soon, I sometimes have a working supply of film in the refrigerator that I can use more spontaneously.

    You can move film back and forth as needed, as long as you haven't opened the canisters or foil packaging.
     
  8. yankeesnapper

    yankeesnapper Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2008
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    Freezing is best but its important to wrap the the film or paper in plastic (mylar) wrap. I purchase mine in our local hardware store and I seal the seams with waterproof tape.
    Its a good thing that I adopted this method as I encountered trouble with my freezer door and It iced up.

    Regards.

    Bob McCarthy
     
  9. Colin Corneau

    Colin Corneau Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,866
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Location:
    Brandon, MB
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Needless to say, don't ever freeze any of the (late lamented) Polaroid product. The chemical pods will be ruined by freezing.
     
  10. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,211
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    S.F. Bay Area
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    It is one of those religious issues....it is my opinion that the fridge is fine. I keep the bulk of my unexposed film in the bottom of the china cabinet.
     
  11. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

    Messages:
    5,682
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    We don't need to think about this in terms of "opinions". It is not a complicated issue.

    Temperature does make a difference.
    The freezer is best for longer storage.
    The cooler is quite o.k., for storage upto the "use by" date printed on the box.
     
  12. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

    Messages:
    2,223
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    Regina, SK,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I agree with Q.G. It's a question of convenience. If you won't know what film you want to use until a moment before you need it, you probably need to keep at least a few rolls unrefrigerated. The bigger your film inventory and the more likely you are going to keep it until or past the expiry date, the more important refrigeration (and better, freezing) are. Professional film should always be refrigerated, at a minimum, whenever possible.
     
  13. bvstaples

    bvstaples Member

    Messages:
    10
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2007
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I freeze mine, but first I seal the boxes with a Seal-a-Meal; takes out air and moisture. This seems to make it a little quicker to warm up (about an hour to an hour and a half for sheet film and about 20 minutes for rolls. But then I also live in the dry Southwest so moisture isn't much of an issue.

    BVS