Fuji has 160nc?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by DanielStone, Jul 25, 2009.

  1. DanielStone

    DanielStone Member

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    hey all,

    i was just taking a gander at the megaperls site (japan) to see what those guys over in japan get to try out that fuji doesn't release here.


    i noticed that fuji apparently has a pro 160nc color neg film available. i find it interesting that EK hasn't gone after them for product name infringement, if that's possible

    check out the link and you can see for yourself.

    http://www.japanexposures.com/shop/...d=198&osCsid=8f1d6b5eb33826a3d493b217b0581dd1

    they really have some interesting products over there. like acros in 8x10 sheets, yum :smile:



    -dan
     
  2. Brandon D.

    Brandon D. Member

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    haha... maybe they should just put the "nc" in front of the "160," i.e., Fuji NC160. You know, sort of how there's the Canon 50D and the Nikon D50 in the DSLR world. HA!
     
  3. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

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    Sounds like they are trying to be like Kodak with their Portra series.
     
  4. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Fuji used to have NPS and NPC instead of Pro 160S and Pro 160C. In Japan, it looks like they use other names that are a combination of the new names and the old names (minus the P, perhaps for "Professional"?): 160NS and 160NC. It seems fairly obvious that these are what we call Pro 160S and Pro 160C, and used to call NPS and NPC, though I don't know for sure. The Kodak NC is, of course, preceded by "Portra", and labeled "Kodak", and comes in a yellow box, so I doubt people get confused that often.

    For a while (I am not sure how long), Fuji codes for pro film have been S for the low contrast, low saturation, medium speed film (I guess that S = "skin"), C for the high contrast, high saturation, medium speed film (I guess that C = "contrast"), L for the tungsten-balanced medium speed film (L = type L film), H for the 400 speed film (I guess H = "high speed"), and Z for the 800 speed film (I don't know what Z could be...ZOUNDS!!!???). For instance, Fuji NPZ was an 800-speed pro emulsion, and CZ was an 800-speed consumer emulsion (though it could also be bought with the "pro" treatment as Superia Press). Same with NPH and CH. It seems logical that the C = "consumer", the P = "professional", but I don't know what the N could mean.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 25, 2009
  5. clayne

    clayne Member

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    As 2F mentioned, yes, 'C' has been around for ages. But between Fuji and Kodak, NPC/160C is more equal to 160VC rather than 160NC. Kodak's 'C' is "color," where Fuji's 'C' is "contrast."
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    A revelation: N must mean "negative" (and R = "reversal", of course).

    DUH!

    So, is this right?

    R = reversal
    N = negative
    P = professional
    C as first letter (as in Superia emulsions) = consumer
    S = skin
    C as last letter (as in pro emulsions) = contrast
    H = high speed
    Z = ZOUNDS, that's fast!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 28, 2009
  7. WolfTales

    WolfTales Member

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    Always did wonder what the Z in 800 stood for. Or the H for that matter. Any ideas anyone?
     
  8. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    The "H" is silent, just like at the end of bokeh ....