Fuji superia 100/135

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by BBonte, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. BBonte

    BBonte Member

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    Got back from holidays in Toscane. At midday the colors look very flat and without texture. I suppose this is due to the harsch light in Italy at that time of the day. LAte afternoon and evening colors were much warmer. Camera: OM 2, overexposed the film with 1/2 stop.
     
  2. Adrian_I

    Adrian_I Member

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    I am thinking overexposing 1/2 stop a low-contrast negative film is right. At least this is what I'm doing with acceptable results from my point of view.

    I stopped using Fuji Superia 100 for the same reason: lack of contrast, flat pictures. For negative film I switched to Fuji Superia 200. It has more contrast and it is not so grainy.

    If I need more "punching" colour I use slide film (Fuji Provia).

    You might have a point here. The place where I take most of the shots (the town where I'm living, I think it's natural) is at the same latitude as Toscana. Probably Superia 100 is the film you are using normally when you are at home. At 44 - 45° latitude, midday light can really ruin your picture at summer time. You may find a better light in winter. This is another reason why during long trips I'm carrying at least 2 cameras with me: one with negative and another one with slide film.

    Is somebody else having a different personal experience? I think this problem is interesting: connecting latitude and season with the preffered colour film.

    You should check this forum for some opinions, too.

    Kind regards,
    Adrian
     
  3. BBonte

    BBonte Member

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    Hello Adrian,
    So I should have used slide film. I had the same results with Superia 200 on my Rollei 35. Is Kodak color negative film a better choice for this kind of harsh light conditions ?
     
  4. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    Try getting the negatives in question reprinted. The detail is likely there.

    It is more difficult to shoot in midday but it is not impossible.
     
  5. Andy K

    Andy K Member

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  6. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    The polarizing filter is a good suggestion, a cheaper way to get a similar effect although not as pronounced is a UV light filter. A really good lens shade always helps too.
    It is difficult to get good color in the middle of the day. I've never gotten real good at it. Mostly I use color mornings and evenings, and black & white during the day (for much better contrast control).

    I love the Superia 200, and used to use Superia 100 for all my color shots but changed to the 200 for the same reasons as above. I'm not sure I agree the 200 is less grainy than the 100, I would say it's the opposite.
    Like a few others here, I use slide film if I have to have more snap in the colors. I prefer Kodak E100-VS or the newer E100G (I think it's called). Or the EliteChrome Extra Color is fun too.

    - Thom
     
  7. Andy K

    Andy K Member

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    I ordered twenty rolls of Superia 200 and twenty rolls of Superia 400 from 7Day Shop.com this week. They currently have an excellent deal on.
     
  8. Adrian_I

    Adrian_I Member

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    You are right, Thom. what I was trying to say was that Superia 200 is not very grainy in general and not by comparaison with 100.

    I'm sorry if I was misleading you.

    Regards,
    Adrian