Fuji Velvia 50 to be Discontinued...

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Dave Parker, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Just got this from a friend of mine.......


    Further reading on the Fuji web page reveals this:

    "Availability - The new Fujichrome Velvia 100 is designed to replace the current Velvia 50 product line. Initial shipments of the new Velvia 100 are scheduled for late spring 2005. It is anticipated that Velvia 50 will be available for the balance of 2005. Fujifilm intends to make the transition from Velvia 50 to the new Velvia 100 as smooth as possible for professional photographers by having both Velvia products available simultaneously in 2005 to allow photographers time to test the new product."


    Time to start stocking the Fridge.

    Dave
     
  2. Mongo

    Mongo Member

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    Where on the Fuji web site?
     
  3. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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  4. BruceN

    BruceN Member

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    Well I, for one, can't wait to get hold of some of the new stuff and try it out. If it really gives me the same color saturation as Velvia 50 with finer grain and one stop faster I'll dance a jig. :smile:
     
  5. FrankB

    FrankB Member

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    I'm confused.

    The release says they're introducing Velvia 100 in Spring 2005 with the intention of replacing 50 after the end of the year. Is this a different Velvia 100 to the one that's already in the shops and has been for about a year...?!
     
  6. Mongo

    Mongo Member

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    Thanks for the link Dave.
     
  7. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Velvia 100F and Velvia 100 are two different films, I myself don't like Velvia 100F, the depth and saturation is not there as it is with the ISO 50, but people I know in Japan where the 100 has been available have stated the non-'F' Emulsion is very close to the 50 and if you shoot at 80 and process normally you will see the same depth and color saturation as 50 shot at 50. But I know a great many of us that shoot 50 at 40 and process normally.


    Dave
     
  8. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I've kind of been expecting this for sometime. While the 100F isn't bad - it is what I primarily use - I prefer the 50 speed film for its color. I've been wishing the 100 would finally come to the US, so I could get the speed and color together.

    I'm willing to bet that the photo magazines like "Outdoor Photography" ("Outdoor Photoshop") will ignore it as they have the Nikon F6.
     
  9. kaiyen

    kaiyen Member

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    I have heard that the 100F variant isn't (as?) susceptible to shaded areas going blue as either Velvia 50 or, for that matter, Provia 100F. But it's not nearly as saturated, certainly, as V50

    allan
     
  10. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Yes Allan, you are correct, but this is at the expence of the color saturation and depth of the iso 50 varient, the 100F is a easier emulsion to shoot, but not quite as good as the 50. But that is one of the those experiance things, understanding how the subtle differences in emulsions can make a dramatic difference in the redering of an image.

    it will be interesting to see what develops.

    Dave
     
  11. BruceN

    BruceN Member

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    I like the 100F for it's incredible resistance to reciprocity failure - you can go up to a full minute with neither exposure nor color compensation. That is also at the expense of the color saturation, though. I hope the 100 shows these properties, but with the great colors of V50. I like shooting in low light, so right now it's 100F for ease of exposure calculation, etc.
     
  12. roy

    roy Member

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    I never found Velvia to be as fast as 50 so if the new film speed is accurate, it might be more than one stop.
     
  13. Woolliscroft

    Woolliscroft Member

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    Lets hope the 100 is as good as they say. I am starting to run out of freezer space with all the other films I am having to stockpile.

    David.
     
  14. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    I've shot the 50 at a 4 min exposure and didn't have a colour shift. I was amazed, and very pleased since 8x10 film isn't cheap.
     
  15. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    After shooting Velvia for about 10 years now, I have never had a reciprocity failure problem with long exposures.

    Dave
     
  16. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Aargh! I'm primarily B&W but colour I shoot mostly with Velvia 50 - looove the colours and it works really well in the harsh Australian sun. I'll place a photo into the gallery. Yep, it's colour! :smile:
     
  17. gbroadbridge

    gbroadbridge Member

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    Sound's like good news to me. Faster with smiliar grain

    Graham
     
  18. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    'simular' that is the key word, Kodak tried to push that down our throats as well, when they discontiued Kodachrome 25....more speed, less grain, is an oxy-moron...


    Dave
     
  19. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Velvia is a bit overkill for portraits - it does terrible things to skin colors. Have you tried Provia F100; I think you will like it much better.
     
  20. mark

    mark Member

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    I think the provia would have left Nicole's daughter a sickly blue in that lighting situation, unless she used an 81A filter as well. Astia might have been a better choice.
     
  21. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Yes, I think Astia would have been the ultimate choice; I tend to think of primarily films used for landscape work and forgot about Astia. Perhaps, Astia with either an 81A or a gold reflector. Velvia just does terrible things with skin tones.
     
  22. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    lol, thanks for the suggestions. I shot this portrait with Velvia because it's what I had in the camera at the time. And I actually really like the 'glow' it gives off. Not something I'd do professionally but for home use I can get some interesting effects.
    I don't like the gold reflector much as it gives too much 'shine'. Again, it depends on the situation. I like using NPH400 for colour portraits due to the gentle subtleness I can get.
     
  23. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I find myself doing that quite often; that is one of the drawbacks to using 35mm. In my article: http://www.visionlandscapes.com/ArticlesTips.aspx?ArticleID=7 about most of the way down the page, there is an image of a man pouring sand into a bottle. I too, found myself with Velvia in the camera, and it took a lot of PS work to get his skin color right.