Fujifilm announces Velvia 100F and Astia 100F

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Thilo Schmid, Feb 21, 2003.

  1. Thilo Schmid

    Thilo Schmid Member

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  2. Prime

    Prime Member

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    Thanks for the info! I hope that the new Velvia has reciprocity similar to that of Provia 100F. If this is the case, Velvia 100F could easily become my new favorite, as I've been wishing that Provia 100F had a bit more contrast and greater color-saturation.
     
  3. b.e.wilson

    b.e.wilson Member

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    I don't get it. The phrases, "brings the ultra-high-saturated color of Fujifilm's renowned Velvia", and "world-class color fidelity" appear in neighboring sentances.

    Which is it, I wonder?

    And the next paragraph sure is interesting:

    U.S. Introduction of Instant, Peel-Apart Film for Professionals
    Fujifilm will introduce to the U.S. marketplace its professional instant color film FP-100C, which produces exceptional picture quality and excellent color reproduction. This ISO 100 instant color film, optimized for use under direct sunlight or electronic flash, produces prints with little to no gradation imbalance, from highlights to shadows, superior light fading characteristics and reduced color variations caused by elongated peeling time. Fujifilm will also introduce FP-100B, an EI 100 instant black and white film, and FP-3000B, an EI 3200 instant black and white film to the U.S.


    New emulsions, just when I'd gotten Velvia and Provia development and printing pretty much dialed in....
     
  4. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (b.e.wilson @ Feb 21 2003, 08:15 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>

    New emulsions, just when I'd gotten Velvia and Provia development and printing pretty much dialed in.... </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    It seems film manufacturers do this on purpose just to mess with people. Look at T Max and Kodak, just when everybody was comfortable and using TMX films. They go an change it.....typical
     
  5. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Voof... I just accessed that site and read ... most of it. Condensation: "We're bringing out a bunch of new `stuff'".

    Hmm... from the "hype" section:

    "As a result of these technologies, the final product features vibrant skin tones (?), clear whites (??), sharp definition ( nah... I'll leave it alone), and [ is an accurate reflection of the photographer's original vision...]"

    Oh, it is, is it? ... And just HOW do you guys know what my "original vision" was?
     
  6. Thilo Schmid

    Thilo Schmid Member

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (b.e.wilson @ Feb 21 2003, 03:15 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I don't get it. The phrases, "brings the ultra-high-saturated color of Fujifilm's renowned Velvia", and "world-class color fidelity" appear in neighboring sentances.
    </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    The color rendition of Velvia was never indisputable. Some like it some hate it and some other use it for certain applications.

    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (b.e.wilson @ Feb 21 2003, 03:15 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>New emulsions, just when I'd gotten Velvia and Provia development and printing pretty much dialed in.... </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>

    In this case, You are a little late to this ;-) Velvia has been introduced over 10 years ago. His replecement was actually overdue. It has been the oldest color film on market, except from Kodachrome.
     
  7. Thilo Schmid

    Thilo Schmid Member

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Ed Sukach @ Feb 21 2003, 05:07 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> Oh, it is, is it? ... And just HOW do you guys know what my &quot;original vision&quot; was? </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    Well, it's hard for the marketing people of conventional photo stuff to keep up with the digitalists these days. We should be a little more lenient ;-)
     
  8. b.e.wilson

    b.e.wilson Member

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (tschmid @ Feb 21 2003, 12:33 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> [In this case, You are a little late to this ;-) Velvia has been introduced over 10 years ago. His replecement was actually overdue. It has been the oldest color film on market, except from Kodachrome. </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    True, but Velvia was introduced to photography before I was.
     
  9. baronfoxx

    baronfoxx Member

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    most of the above posters are being a bit "picky" and must keep in mind that most advertizing copy writers pay no heed to the truth and probably know very little about true phpotography.
     
  10. Super Graphic Guy

    Super Graphic Guy Member

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    The extra stop should help eliminate some of the reciprocity problems I often run into shooting Velvia. If all other characteristics are the same, then I will still religate it to limited use on total overcast days. Don't realy like it's color rendition, but do love it's contrast POP.
     
  11. fparnold

    fparnold Member

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    I like the way it separates (manufactures?) green and blue-green tones in deep woods, while keeping clean greys. I remember my first roll of its predecessor, Fujichrome-50. I had some slides on Kodachrome, and being a cheap student, had bought the 50 at discount from a local store by taking 6 or so outdated rolls off their hands at once. I had thought that Kodachrome was kind of 'bright', but saw those first slides from the Fuji which made the Kodachrome look weak and undersaturated.

    I keep some around, but treat it with the same care I do a plugged-in coffee grinder or hot stove.
     
  12. SteveGangi

    SteveGangi Member

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    I guess a higher speed Velvia is OK. Personally I always thought the saturation and contrast was too much for everyday use. It's one of those films that are best when the day is overcast. I never liked it for "people shots". The skin always looked wrong. But if you shoot greenery or flowers in the shade, then it is good. Oh yeah, I pretty much had TMax figured out when they decided to change it. Now I am just collecting hearsay and data from other people before I buy it (and I still have a box of the "classic" TMax in the fridge).
     
  13. David Hall

    David Hall Member

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    The extra stop of Velvia is going to help. But what would REALLY help is better reciprocity. That way you could put that extra stop to better use in really overcast and lower light conditions.

    dgh
     
  14. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (David Hall @ Feb 22 2003, 05:48 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>The extra stop of Velvia is going to help.&nbsp; But what would REALLY help is better reciprocity.&nbsp; That way you could put that extra stop to better use in really overcast and lower light conditions.&nbsp;

    dgh</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    I agree. This film has always disapointed me due to the green shift when it starts to suffer reciprocity failure. For my tastes the palette is to 'candy coated.' I like my films evil.
     
  15. SteveGangi

    SteveGangi Member

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    My boss calls it "Disney colors", and I have to agree. For most things, it is usually just too garish and fake looking. I always liked more neutral films, even if they don't JUMP at you.
     
  16. Robert Kennedy

    Robert Kennedy Member

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    I like Velvia for shooting in the desert. Things tend to get a bit brown/dull green here. The Velvia can give it some extra pop.

    That said, Velvia in a portrait session is a sin.
     
  17. Thilo Schmid

    Thilo Schmid Member

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