Fujimoto CP51

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Matt Brown, May 16, 2011.

  1. Matt Brown

    Matt Brown Member

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    Is anyone running their Fujimoto CP51 on a step-up voltage transformer? I just purchased one, and am now trying to figure out my electrical issues with the 240V it requires for use.

    Thanks,

    -Matt
     
  2. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    240V is used in such devices for limiting current draw to run the heaters, usually. If you are keen to install a 5kW dry type transformer, and then get a 30plus amp 120V service installed, go ahead.

    I know of a gal in town who cooks entirely on a small plug in hot plate and microwave in her kitchen, because her Kreonite RA-4 roller processor sits where the stiove would be, and uses its stove outlet for a 240V power source in her apartment.
     
  3. Matt Brown

    Matt Brown Member

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    Thanks, Mike.

    My choice right now is to either keep the CP51 in a basement darkroom, which has a Washer/Dryer hook-up that I may be able to run it off of, or move it to a studio space that does not have a 240V plug-in, and figure something out.
     
  4. George Nova Scotia

    George Nova Scotia Subscriber

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    Matt, you might be able to use the dryer connection. Electric dryers are usually 240, washers usually just 120. You could make a plug cable to adapt the dryer plug to the plugs required for the unit. In looking at the specs, the main unit needs 3.9 amp at 240. You might be able to source a transformer to run that part, might not be cheap. The dryer side of the CP51 needs a lot more current and a 240 circuit would be the best choice.

    A lot of this has to do with the wire gauge in the wall. You might want to talk to an electrician and get some estimates. Existing wiring dosn't usually plan for equipment like the CP51.
     
  5. Matt Brown

    Matt Brown Member

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    Hey George,

    It looks like we we have a dryer plug running 240 right next to where we want to put the CP-51 body and washer/dryer unit. I'm going to an electrical supply store today to see if there is any kind of plug cable to make the adapter you're talking about. It will probably come down to getting an electrician in the next couple of weeks, but this should work out pretty well with the set-up we have. Thanks for the info. I'm pouring over the manuals right now!
     
  6. George Nova Scotia

    George Nova Scotia Subscriber

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    Best of luck, I doubt you'll find anything ready made but it should be doable. Keep in mind that the plugs will vary in size depending on the current. The manual says you need two NEMA code 6-20-R receptacles. So a dryer plug to match what you have, some at least 12 gauge stranded cable (10 would be better but harder to work with) a surface mount box and a couple receptacles should just about do it.
     
  7. EdSawyer

    EdSawyer Member

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    Any electrician or electrical supply store is going to frown on the idea of using the dryer connection and plugs/cables to come up with that solution. Not that you can't do it, just that it won't be approved or up to code probably.

    Most normal houses have 220v/240v by nature. The line coming from the pole is 240v, 2-phase so +120v and -120v plus neutral (ground). When it gets to the house, the normal 120v wiring is just one side of the 240v connection, plus neutral. Running 240v to an outlet is no harder than running a new 120 line, except you need 2 runs of 12/2 cable or whatever you use. By taking a connection off both sides of the box (e.g. where your power service comes into the house - the circuit breaker box), then using the 2 hots, you have 240v connection. Ground is as normal.

    I am not an electrician but that's how 240v is hooked up, generally, from what I've read. YMMV. But doing that would be safer than adapting a system to plug into dryer outlet.

    I have a CP-51 also but haven't hooked it up yet, but when I do, this (above) is the route I'll likely take.

    http://www.nojolt.com/basic-220-circuits.shtml

    -Ed
     
  8. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    My suggestion would be to buy/salvage a dryer plug and cable.

    Wire it to supply a two pole fused disconnect (which actually used to be how most dryer receptacles were once fed)

    Then wire the 6-20 receptacle off of the fuses. Buy 20A fuses, so that the receptacle is approprately protected.

    If you need two 6-20 receptacles, then gang together two fused disconnects fed from the same 30/40 amp dryer circuit ( I say 30/40, because different areas regulate the overcurrent protection to the dryer receptacle differently).
     
  9. Matt Brown

    Matt Brown Member

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    Thanks, everyone for your advice.

    It turns out that there will be no need to sacrifice dryer plugs, as my girlfriend and I are moving our darkroom equipment into an actual studio. We got an estimate from an electrician about putting in a 20 amp circuit and a 240V line and will be doing so in about a month. We'll be installing the CP51 and using a Durst M607 enlarger and an Omega D5 XL in the space, which is extremely well ventilated and already has a darkroom sink.

    Thanks again!