german film identity

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by glbeas, Aug 21, 2004.

  1. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    What does it look like under the wrapper?
     
  2. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    Easter egg hunt. Ain't it fun? :D

    Wonder how many other little discoveries are out there to tell about? I've used a lot of oddball stuff now and again, mostly old graphic arts films.
     
  3. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    My guess is that Agfa is the manufacturer ... a *wild* assumption based on the "red" on the package. Agfa seems to be partial to using the color red.

    I'd be curious to find out about its age; Although Kodak does imprint "Safety Film" on the margins of its film - to advertise the fact that it is not a nitrocellulose base material "(read *FLAMMABLE* as #$@!) I don't think Agfa has done that for many moons. Interesting.

    You should be able to tell more from the film backing itself.

    A while ago, I bought a single roll of exposed "Ansco Plenachrome" in an antique shop in North Carolina. My best research indicates that it was probably exposed in the late 1930's. I developed it in Rodinal (made a "clip" test") and succeeded in getting images!! That film DID have a nitrocellulose (incidentally, the main ingredient in smokeless gunpowder) base.
     
  4. gma

    gma Member

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    I have tentatively identified this wrapper as Perutz Peromnia 21, that I bought in the 60's. It was very cheap at the time and not anything special as I recall. I hope a member from Europe can confirm the film brand name. That would make me feel better about my memory.
     
  5. gma

    gma Member

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    DIN 21 = ASA 100. Surely there will be some info on the paper backing when you receive the film. I would feel better about the identification if someone can confirm.
     
  6. skahde

    skahde Member

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    100 ASA, 21/10th° DIN or 100/21 ISO. ;-)

    Stefan
     
  7. gma

    gma Member

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    I know I have read on a previous thread that there is a chemical additive that will help with the fog of old film. Why not start a new thread with "Fog in out dated film". That should bring a quick response.
     
  8. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    benzotriazole
     
  9. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    j -

    if you have any mixed ... try processing your film in ansco 130.
    i usually process expired tri-x ( 80s-90s ) rated at 150-200 and get very little fog.

    i dilute it 1:5 @ 72º at 8 mins, but that is sheet film in trays, not roll film.