Give 2 35mm away for a medium format?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by marciofs, May 15, 2014.

  1. marciofs

    marciofs Member

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    I have already a Pentax 6x7 for landscape and Bronoca ETRs-I for portraits.
    My Nikon F3 and FM are my backups.

    I like both specially for street photographs, but I think I have too many cameras and lenses and I would like to have something to replace them which I still could continuous with my street shots and travel. So I was wondering about change them for a twin lens camera (6x6). It is doesn't need to much space to store and carry in the streets and travels, nicer size negatives and I can use as my main camera for portraits and studio shots while I have my bronica as backup.


    Whay Am I saying it here???
    Because I want to hear from others if they think I could miss some possible benefices from 35mm I could be forgetting now. A part from the fact that I will shoot less since I will have less frames per negatives. But is there anything else I could regret?
     
  2. mweintraub

    mweintraub Subscriber

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    I like and hate 35mm.

    I like:
    Long rolls
    Small bodies (compared to MF)


    I hate:
    Long rolls
    Bag tends to get filled with multiple lenses on outings
    Scanning is a chore due to long rolls

    Given the above, I shoot way more MF (645, 6x6, and 6x7) than I do any 35mm. Of course, that doesn't keep me from selling all my 35mm. =/


    So, my advice to you (but I don't take my own advice), if you don't use it much and don't see yourself using it a lot in the future, go ahead and trade it in for something you'll use.
     
  3. snapguy

    snapguy Member

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    TLR Rolleiflexes and some Yashicamats have 35mm adapters so you can shoot 120 or 35mm. The 35mm adapters utilize a vertical (portrait) format. They work great. A TLR with a 35mm adapter and a 70 or 80mm lens is great for portraits and you can sync at 1/500 sec., too.
     
  4. mweintraub

    mweintraub Subscriber

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    Forgot to add that if you keep to one film format, you only have to buy / keep one film format.
     
  5. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber

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    You listed only 4 cameras and you say too many :smile:? Don't get me started ...

    Anyhow I think you will not get that much money for the nikons - and they are terrific cameras. And people change - maybe in a year or two you will need 35mm cameras, and then buying again...Just left them at home.
     
  6. dehk

    dehk Member

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    Well, if you need something that requires you to shoot more frames than a roll of 120 in a short period of time.

    Also 35mm permits the use of larger aperture lenses.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 15, 2014
  7. film_man

    film_man Member

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    I'll tell you what I did. At some point I had a Hasselblad, RB67, FM2n and OM1. I shoot mostly 120 so thought I'll get rid of my FM2n (which I used with a 50/1.4 and a 35/2, both Zeiss) as it was a lot of money sitting around (the Zeiss, not the FM2n...) and have the OM1 for the rare occasion when I want 35mm. Turns out I really disliked my OM1 which is why I never used it when I had the FM2n. So I sold that thinking that I don't need 35mm at all. A month later I got myself a EOS 3 with an Ultron 40/2. It just has its place.

    In the end, it really depends what you shoot and how. I use the MF for most stuff but use 35mm most for a bit more faster portrait stuff (eg kids). To be honest I really wish I kept the FM2+Zeiss 50, that was a sweet combo. But the EOS 3 with the 40 is really nice too, it is a fast camera and the lens is great too. I also really like sometimes just walking around and thinking "oh I still have another 32 shots left...cool".

    So basically what I'm saying...well noone knows except you. I know, much help that is... :smile:
     
  8. TheToadMen

    TheToadMen Subscriber

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    An other question: how much Nikon lenses do you have?
    I would personally keep the Nikon F3 with one good lens - if money isn't a problem.
    A TLR camera is very nice to use - but in some / many instances a F3 will work much quicker/better in street photography.

    But before you do anything, try to shoot a few roles with a TLR first, before you buy one. I personally like it, but a lot of folks don't like shooting this way. It is very, very different from shooting a SLR camera. Even from the Pentax or Bronica.

    And will you get a TLR with or without a build-in light meter? Als an important factor for spontaneous or fast street photography.
    Bert from Holland
     
  9. skysh4rk

    skysh4rk Member

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    I sold my 35mm cameras and lenses to concentrate on 6x6. I mostly use my Bronica SQ-A, but when I need to travel light or inconspicuously, I use my Minolta Autocord TLR. No one seems to notice the TLR when I'm taking pictures out on the street and it's deadly silent.

    I don't miss 135 format at all.
     
  10. Alan Gales

    Alan Gales Subscriber

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    The only 35mm camera I shoot any more is my Stereo Realist. For me, my DSLR has replaced my 35mm camera. Digital is great for sports, family snap shots and Ebay pics.

    Since I have an 8x10 camera with both 8x10 and 4x5 backs, I rarely shoot my medium format Hasselblad anymore.

    To answer your question, I think it depends on you and what you like to shoot. We are all different.
     
  11. fotch

    fotch Member

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    The way I see it, cameras are some of the tools that are used to make a picture, similar to chisels, knives, saws, are some of the tools to shape wood. Like any tools, different cameras have different characteristics in taking a picture just, just as different tools are used in cutting, shaping wood.

    Sometimes a 35mm is the right tool to take a photo, sometimes it is not. You can limit yourself, if that is what you want to do, and still accomplish your goals. You can have too many tools and not be proficient in using all of them. Each person has to decide for themselves what the need.
     
  12. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Keep all 4 cameras. Your style and taste will change.

    Jeff
     
  13. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber

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    Exactly. For me was other way around: I had rolleiflex, but square format was hard and irritating for me. So I sold it. After couple of years ... guess what: I have rolleiflex and diana F.
     
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  15. TheToadMen

    TheToadMen Subscriber

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    Even better: also get an original 6x4.5 insert for the Rolleiflex ;-)
     
  16. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    The 35mm format is losing out heavily and profoundly to the simplicity and sensibility of medium format. I think it will be the first format lost in film if its decline in take-up continues among manufacturers. Besides that, the 36 exposures is way too much for me, and I suspect it is the same for legions of other photographers now. More than a decade past I would chew through 36 exposures with various changes to composition and metering — effectively a lavish exercise in bracketing. I would be lucky to two two brackets in (6x7) MF now. The smaller format is fine if you are into shoot-from-the-hip style doco/street or even sport and you can genuinely put each frame to good use, but if making every image pay with startling clarity and impact is the objective, medium format will always win over 35mm, that is despite never having been endowed with (or hobbled by) the technology that made 35mm so useful (to a point).

    You should keep the Pentax 6x7 and one 35mm. The significance of the TLR is not known. The collection you have is complicated and can give rise to indecision and encumbrance at times when you least need it.
     
  17. baachitraka

    baachitraka Member

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    I will look for a camera where you can change the roll of film easily on the street.

    My personal case
    Rolleicord: Not so happy when changing the roll.
    Agfa Isolette(Solinar lens): Compare to Rolleicord it is way easier.

    35mm film camera still wins for me in this regard.
     
  18. dorff

    dorff Member

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    I would keep them. You think four cameras are too many? Poor dear.

    35 mm can do things easily that the other formats can't do, or can do only with great difficulty.

    If you are a decent printer, you'll be able to get excellent prints out of carefully exposed 35 mm frames. Yes, MF film is better to print from, but you can't print a photograph that was never taken.
     
  19. ruilourosa

    ruilourosa Member

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    keep the rollei and if it has a planar keep it closer, film takes a bit to be changed but the house is not on fire
     
  20. baachitraka

    baachitraka Member

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    If I have a lot of cash, I may go with a TLR(Planar lens) and a Leica.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2014
  21. marciofs

    marciofs Member

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    This is what I am afraid of. And I am a kind of starving photographer. I don't have much left to get a new camera without selling something.

    I could of course leave things as they are but I can totally see the convenience of TLR because of its size, format, and so on. I am almost sure that I would only shoot with it on most or all subjects, streets, portraits, travel and landscapes. Because the Pentax is serious heavy and the Bronica seems to be a bit bigger and the negative frame smaller.

    An other thing is that I often waist frames shooting with 35mm just because I am too anxious to develop and see the results of the earlier shots. I think it is because I got into film photography with a Bronica I started using 35mm for travel because the cameras are smaller and lighter and I ended up using 35mm for street. But I actually would be glad on photographing the streets with a light and small medium format camera.



    I think 36 frames per roll is to many. There are very few times I was glad to had many frames to shoot, like in events I find in the streets, but when it happens I shoot I entire roll to get less than a half keeper photos.

    There is only one thing I really like is to take 35mm portraits with 85mm lens. But I also like really like the results fro Bronica lenses. And if I can get a TLR with a good portrait lens I believe I wouldn't miss the 35mm cameras with 85mm lens.

    I have a 28mm 2.8 that I barely use, two 50mm 1.8 (one is older and the other is more modern) and a 85mm 1.8. All nikon.

    If I can keep the F3 and one 50mm, and selling or bater everything else for a TLR camera with one or two nice lenses, I will.

    I haven't thought about it actually.

    I actually got my 35mm cameras fin a period when I was often travelling, so the 35mm was nicer to carry around. But also because I expected that one day I would be doing wedding, after had experienced working on 2 weddings (with digital cameras though), and I wish to be prepered with 2 35mm and I really wanted to do on film. But I never manage to photograph any other wedding or events.

    But what I tell to myself is that 35mm film cameras are cheap and there are a lot in the market. I will keep one if I can but if not I think it is easier to go back to 35mm when I wish.




    I will now look for some reviews on TLR cameras on YouTube to help me decide which one is better for me.

    Thank you all for the brainstorm.
     
  22. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber

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    > 36 frames per roll is to many

    Just buy 24 frames. Right now there is excellent deal on macodirekt: 2 euros for Kentmere 400/24. One keeper per roll is good - half keepers is excellent!

    Good call for keeping F3 and 50mm. In any case you will get more money from other lenses - 50mm are cheap and good - not worth selling.
     
  23. pdjr1991

    pdjr1991 Subscriber

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    I highly recommend a tlr for street photography. Do get one with a split finder. I shoot with a rolleicord and love it. Changing film is a huge downside. Takes forever. It is also another viewpoint, which i like but you may not. I think the view point is more intimate. That could just be me though. I do not recommend the Mamiya c3. I have one and it does not work for me street photo wise. I think rollei takes the cake.
     
  24. marciofs

    marciofs Member

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    I have read that usually TLR lenses are very sharp.
    But I have not found good reviews on Yashica model.
     
  25. dorff

    dorff Member

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    That part is probably true. If you have a good F3, keep it, because there are few of them. They usually worked very hard - a mint one is exceedingly hard to find and will fetch a high price.

    The main difference between TLR and other cameras is the height from which you'll be shooting, and how it affects how you interact with your subjects. I'm just over 6' tall, too high for many people subjects (especially children) unless I stoop or kneel. A TLR with WLF is a great help in that regard. So by all means go for it. Square format has its own charm, too.
     
  26. mweintraub

    mweintraub Subscriber

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    You get what you pay for. Of course the more expensive Rollei models will be sharper. The Yashicas are pretty sharp but are in the $100-$200 ranges. Also, something to consider is that the Rolleis will probably be better maintained as people tend to baby them more and get them services more regularly.


    Not award winning, but just some shots from a Yashica 124G
    http://www.weintraubphoto.com/2013/06/las-vegas-on-film/