Given aload of Kodachrome super 8 film - reversal processing as b/w?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by jm94, Jul 29, 2012.

  1. jm94

    jm94 Member

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    Hello guys! I have been given aloud do Kodachrome super 8 and a super 8 camera as a gift the flm having expired in 96. However I am not sure where to start with reversal processing as a black and white positive.
    I know I need to remove the remjet layer after processing I have it thought out how to develop it (first developer, bleach, wash, reexpose to light, redevelop, wash and fix then remove the remjet layer. However I am facing a dilemma with a reversal bleach. I do not want to use chromium / sulfuric acid based, I don't like the thought of handling it. Are there any alternatives I can buy the raw chemicals for, or one premade?

    Also if I am using the Kodachrome is there anything else I need to be aware of? I am not looking for top quality I am looking for a grainy result! Gonna shoot a silent horror movie and want the most grainy muddy result I can get while it still being watchable.

    It is Kodachrome 40 type A.

    Any advice would be appreciated! I have searched for hours on b/w reversal as I didn't want to make a new topic, but can't find much alternative and also if there is something I have missed,

    Jacob
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 29, 2012
  2. mopar_guy

    mopar_guy Subscriber

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    Tri-X Reversal film is still available in Super 8 through B&H.

    Edit: Adoramma has it too.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 29, 2012
  3. jm94

    jm94 Member

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    I don't plan to shoot super 8 as a hobby so to speak but I think it would be quite fun shooting and developing what I have been given here :smile: who knows I may really enjoy it :smile:
     
  4. jm94

    jm94 Member

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    Double post of me... I have researched a way to possible acheve the look I want, I could also do this with normal b/w stock... Expose the film and then develop... Then a wash, then sepia toner to tone the undeveloped silver halide to silver sulfide.(skipping the toner bleach step) Then use a ferricyanide or standard E6 bleach to bleach the negative silver image, then fix. Leaving just the silver sulfide (previously unexposed silver halide)... Positive image. That would give it a nice sepia look when projected too, I would also overexpose by a couple of stops...

    would this be a reasonable idea?

    Jacob
     
  5. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    I have 50 carts of K40 in my freezer that I plan to shoot as B&W one of these days. There was quite a bit of discussion about processing it as B&W reversal on the cinematography.com forum a year or so ago, and here and there, probably on APUG too. I recall it was said that you do get an increase in grain, but it is not bad. You also have to either overexpose a bit (not sure how much) when filming, or push it a bit in developing. The standard B&W reversal process works fine. Personally, I don't think the bleaches are all that dangerous to use so long as you use nitrile gloves and make sure you don't inhale any of the dichromate when mixing.

    Negative processing is preferred for old and poorly stored film.


    Edit: I forgot to say, the sepia toner method you mentioned sounds promising too. I hope someone who is more chemically qualified will chime in on whether or not that process will work. I might like to try that too.
     
  6. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Member

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    Major problem is the rem jet. it will soften in any alkaline chemicals, and then want to get over everything. folks have found it to stick to the emulsion if it gets there
     
  7. jm94

    jm94 Member

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    Yeah that was a concern, seeing as the developer is a base but I will try soaking in a borax bath with strong agitation, and then doing several rinses, then developing processes, then try and wash off what may be left with a bit of elbow grease.
    I do intend, however to buy some tri x and ektachrome reversal stock next week, I thought if usable the Kodachrome would be a good way to learn super 8, without spending too much with less film wastage. I do intend to explore all aspects of film that I can :smile: I do plan also to have a stab at e6 processing, as for the tri x I plan to do sepia-reversal and also some b/w I guess if mixed safely the bleaches should be fine but I'll admit I had misgivings I do most mixing especially powders, outside anyway. I won't use a sulfuric acid based one, I want to avoid handling that at all costs.

    P.s is the ektachrome super 8 being discontinued? I have seen rumours circulating about its demise, leaving only negative stock which would put me off doing super 8 in colour because projection is my intended use.

    Jacob
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  8. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    Here is the Kodak page on Super 8 -- Spotlight on Super 8.

    Ektachrome 100D is still listed. I have not seen a discontinuance notice, but if you come across one, I'd love to know.
     
  9. nexus757

    nexus757 Member

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    SUGGESTED SOLUTION FORMULAS:

    FIRST DEVELOPER: Add 9.5 grams of sodium thiosulfate to 1 liter of Kodak
    D-19 developer regular strength.

    BLEACH: To one liter of water add 9.5 grams of Potassium Dichromate and
    12 ml of concentrated Sulfuric Acid.

    CLEARING BATH: To one liter of water add 90 grams of Sodium Sulfite.

    SECOND DEVELOPER: Use regular D-19 (unaltered).

    FIXER: Use Kodak Rapid Fixer or similar.


    The recommended starting point times for a standard
    (non-rewind) tank at 20C (68F):

    FIRST DEVELOPER: 6 min.
    RINSE: 2-5 min. (change water frequently)
    BLEACH: 1-2 min.
    CLEARING BATH: 2 min.
    RINSE/RE-EXPOSE (You can't overexpose at this point)
    SECOND DEVELOPER: 5 min.
    RINSE/FIX/DRY normally.
     
  10. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Member

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    When Kodak announced the demise of all the still Ektachrome, they did say that it would not affect the Movie version. perhaps there is a subtle difference in the movie version (anti-static backing?) so it is a separate coating, or they may just have a 3 year supply in the freezer. :sad:
     
  11. SkipA

    SkipA Member

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    My guess is they have a 3 year supply in the freezer. Shoot it and enjoy it while you can. Meanwhile, it's still popular with some 16mm shooters too, so that helps.