Glass or Plastic?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by jvoller, Jan 30, 2013.

  1. jvoller

    jvoller Member

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    Just getting back into film developing after a hiatus and am re-equipping to some degree. Any thoughts on whether glass or plastic graduated cylinders, for chemical mixing, are preferable? I used to use plastic, and remember them getting brittle and "fogging" up a bit, but perhaps today's plastics are better?
     
  2. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    Plastic won't shatter if you drop it. Just keep them clean.:wink:
     
  3. jk0592

    jk0592 Member

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    I try not to use glass in the darkroom, if you drop a glass container it will break and can easily cause injuries. Plastic or metal containers will not present such risks.
     
  4. rthomas

    rthomas Member

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    I've used exactly one glass container in the darkroom, it was an older jar of chemistry. Nothing bad happened, but it sure made me nervous when I had to pour from it. We have dozens of ancient plastic graduates in the college darkroom where I teach, that were in use when I was a student there twenty years ago (and were already old then). They still work fine.
     
  5. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    Plastic.
     
  6. fotch

    fotch Member

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    I use both, never had a problem dropping and breaking glass, however, I have more plastic probably because easier to buy.. Glass is easier to clean but that does not matter if you rinse plastic immediately.
     
  7. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I usually use plastic in case I drop them.

    Jeff
     
  8. mfohl

    mfohl Subscriber

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    I use both. I used what was available at the time (100 years ago, I think), one glass one for developer, and two plastic ones for stop and fix. And I always use the same graduates for the same component: reduces the importance of cleaning :smile:
     
  9. nicholai

    nicholai Member

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    If not being dropped, i believe glass will last way longer. You shouldn't be in a hurry when printing anyway.
     
  10. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Subscriber

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    And I recently boght a set of Plastic Graduaded cilinders from an e-bay seller and ened up throwing them out as they did not seem to give anywhere close to the same volume as my Old Glass Cyclinder that I harvested out of the Garbage at my High School in the 1960's - it was thrown out as the base was broken, but has enough left of the base that it stands well, and the break has not propogated after all these years

    The Glass ones I got at the same time as the plastic one did corespond in measure, so they were well worth the extra cost.
     
  11. henry finley

    henry finley Member

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    Das macht nichts
     
  12. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    Don't know if this is the situation, but the plastic ones I get have both US and British ounces marked...you might have a mix-up of units!

    I certainly like my glass graduates -- I use a lot of acetone and it eats the plastic graduates! I also have a couple Kodak glass beakers -- on the bottom they say "For Photographic Use Only Kodak" -- the words are cleverly arranged so that what one sees when quickly looking at it is "Only Use Kodak"!
     
  13. TareqPhoto

    TareqPhoto Member

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    Well, i don't know what to say!

    I broke 2 glasses, one is that measuring cylinder but honestly i didn't break it myself, it was a home-maid who cleaned my bathroom so she wasn't so careful and she broke one of the 3, other one is a 5L beaker, i was mixing i think 1 Gallon of D-76, good i managed to pour about 1L or 2L on 1L bottles but then by accident i broke the beaker when i tried to place it on a hard ceramic of my bath and it shattered immediately maybe because of the remaining liquid pressure.

    I bought a 5L beaker for mixing so i will never worry about it, and as much i am careful with my glass measuring graduated cylinders so i will be fine, i may buy some plastic just in case.
     
  14. MartinP

    MartinP Member

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    I use plastic containers for measuring, mixing, storage, film development and for prints too. I have never dropped any of them (in more than thirty years, but I have now jinxed myself...) but bits and pieces of gear do get carted around when travelling and glass could be a problem in those circumstances.

    Someone mentioned a five-litre beaker - I am probably horribly cheap, but for mixing large amounts of Bromophen and so on I just use a bucket (which doesn't get used for anything else) and then measure what goes in to it, instead of what is in it.
     
  15. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    My favorite plastic is polymethylpentene, because stickier solutions like HC-110 syrup pour from it a little more easily than from glass or polyethylene or polypropylene or acrylic. It's also completely clear, but a little bit pricey compared to other options.
     
  16. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    For on top of the magnetic stirrer I use a stainless steel one gallon 'beaker'. I have some SS quart beakers, but they are not easy to measure stuff with -- it is nice to be able to see thru one's graduate. But they last!

    We have some SS trays that we have been using continously for 40+ years (8am to midnight everyday except summer/xmas holidays)...student-tough!

    Vaughn
     
  17. h.v.

    h.v. Member

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    I currently use glass cylinders. My question to those who use plastic cylinders - do the cylinders have trouble staying standing up when they're in a tub of water to keep the temperature (or do you not do that)?
     
  18. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    Not a problem as long as the bath liquid level is below the level of the chemicals. Even glass containers will become buoyant at some point depending on the displacement difference.
     
  19. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Subscriber

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    I got caught on that ones YEARS ago, Now I ONLY use metric, even for the Kodak stuff with the weird 1 to 31 mixing ratio.