glass with high UV transmission

Discussion in 'Contact Printing' started by revaz_kv, Oct 18, 2010.

  1. revaz_kv

    revaz_kv Member

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    Hi everyone!

    Does anyone know what glass should be used for contact printing frame?
    I mean, is there a glass with very high UV transmission? Since better transmission means shorter exposure time.

    There seems to be little info on the subject.
    Any help is appreciated!
     
  2. Michael A. Smith

    Michael A. Smith Subscriber

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    Regular glass is all that is necessary. I am sure there is special glass, but think getting it would be an unnecessary expense.

    Michael A. Smith
     
  3. Shawn Dougherty

    Shawn Dougherty Member

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    The only issue I've had involving print frame glass was Newton's Rings. That was solved by using reflection control framing glass with the slightly textured side toward the negative. I work in a frame shop so just used scrap but it's cheap, a kind framer might even give you a piece. Take your frame in so they can cut it to size.

    Shawn
     
  4. revaz_kv

    revaz_kv Member

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    Thanks for tips!
    So, regular glass is ok for a vacuum frame, which I hope to build myself:unsure:

    What about plexiglass? Is it better when it comes to UV transmission?
    I am asking because I saw a guy on youtube using plexiglass for his contact printing frame.
     
  5. JSebrof

    JSebrof Member

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    As far as glass that transmits UV, don't they make those special UV lenses out of quartz-fluorite glass? I don't know where you'd get that kind of glass in sheet form for contact printing though, or any other form for that matter.
     
  6. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    They use fused quartz or fluorite. Pure.

    Normal glass is mostly (fused) silica, with additions.
     
  7. revaz_kv

    revaz_kv Member

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    Quartz-fluorite > sounds very expensive:confused:

    What glass is used in vacuum printing frames which are for sale at Edwards Engineered Products? Is it a regular glass or something special?
     
  8. Shawn Dougherty

    Shawn Dougherty Member

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    I remember reading somewhere that Plexi blocks more UV than regular glass. Naturally I do not remember the source. =) Might be worth checking into...
     
  9. Michael A. Smith

    Michael A. Smith Subscriber

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    We use regular glass in our vacuum frame.

    Michael A. Smith
     
  10. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Calcium fluorite (CaF2) even better! :smile:

    Failing that (by cost alone...) you could use an offcut of TruVue UV-retardant glass used in MGCF jobbing; most high-end frame shops use this, and all of my Ilfochromes have been framed under it since 1994.
     
  11. tony lockerbie

    tony lockerbie Subscriber

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    Regular 2mm clear glass is the best option. Tru-vue do make a super clear glass, but that is more about removing that slight green tinge than increasing UV transmission. Don't use the Tru-Vue conservation glass because that hardly transmits any UV at all, great for framing, but would make a VERY slow sunlight printing frame!
     
  12. tony lockerbie

    tony lockerbie Subscriber

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    Oh, forgot to mention that Perspex/Acrylic blocks a lot of UV, together with the static and scathing problems, would make that a bad choice as well.
     
  13. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    That, spelled correctly as calcium fluoride, is the Fluorite already mentioned.
    :wink:
     
  14. revaz_kv

    revaz_kv Member

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    Thanks for info!

    So I will use regular glass:smile:
    Regarding the thickness, 2 mm sounds good, although I am probably going to use something thicker and thus heavier
     
  15. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    You say heavier. Is that because you think weight will add more pressure? The pressure comes from the springs (usually three) on the back of a contact frame or the suction of a vacuum frame.

    If you contact print often or all the time there is wear and tear on the glass. Once or twice a year I replace the window grade glass in my contact print frame. Scratches, pin holes and other such damage are just a part of the work for me. It happens. These of course show on the print. I keep two spare glass pieces wrapped in paper in case I need a replacement suddenly, such as breaking it or scratching it. If glass is so easily damaged that is another good reason not to use plastic.

    John Powers