glue for felt?

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by TheFlyingCamera, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    Hi all - I'm trying to put some felt on the platform I made for supporting my Century Master studio camera (I don't have a camera stand at this time - might try to make one later... this platform lets me put the camera on top of my big Gitzo 1425 legs with 1520 head). What kind of glue should I use to adhere the felt to the plywood platform? How liberally or sparingly should I apply it?
     
  2. jmailand

    jmailand Member

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    If your gluing something to wood, like felt, I would use Elmers Wood Glue, or even plain old Elmers glue. I use it a lot for wood to wood projects. The felt would absorb so much of the glue the stuff will probably never come off, what is what I think you would want. Just make sure if the wood has been painted the area to be glued is sanded so it is a little rough, so the glue has something to stick too. The best way would be not to paint the area at all. There are also some other wood glues similar to Elmers Wood Glue, but is basically the same stuff, looks like kinda light tan color, if you cant find Elmers. It shouldn't take too much glue, just apply it evenly.

    James,
     
  3. Donald Miller

    Donald Miller Member

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    A spray on contact type cement should work for this too.
     
  4. Craig

    Craig Subscriber

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    I've used yellow carpenters glue, not applied too thick. I'd squirt a bunch on, and then spread it with a stick so you have an even layer across the plywood, just thick enough to cover the wood.

    If its too thick it will soak through the felt, and you don't want that.
     
  5. Harrigan

    Harrigan Member

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    Super 77 would be contact cement in spray form but I use high quality yellow wood glue to adhere felt to marble all the time. Contact spray is nasty and should be done outside, but it probably will not soak into the felt like the yellow glue will if used liberally. I use it liberally and it works fine on marble and would adhere even better to wood.

    If you do the contact spray get the super 77 the cheap off brand stuff is worthless. Of course coat both the felt and the wood and wait 1/2 hour and apply it.
     
  6. resummerfield

    resummerfield Subscriber

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    The only problem with carpenter's glue is that it will saturate the felt, and make it hard. I would suggest contact cement.
     
  7. DBP

    DBP Member

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    I would use contact cement, lightly.
     
  8. KEK

    KEK Member

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    I would recommend the spray contact adhesive. I glued felt to 1/4" plywood to put on the wall behind my dart board and it worked great. I used wooden dowels from the hardware store to help me lay it up so it wouldn't stick in the wrong position.
     
  9. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    I ended up getting a can of the 3M "77" spray adhesive. Worked like a charm. Only problem of course is that now I have this giant can of spray adhesive that I only needed for a single job. I'll have to find other things I need to stick together now! :D
     
  10. mark

    mark Member

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    Use it to stick any wiggly subjects in place. :smile:
     
  11. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    a tip for 77 spray adhesive long term storage

    take the white and red spray caps, and after you have used one on the inverted can to clean it out at the end of the run, pull them off and leave them immersed in a small glass jar (capped with lid) filled with mineral spirits. The little bit of residual glue that seems to build up around the outside of the spray tip seem to flatten over the spray hole if left in-attended, and claring them out is not like picking a bit of paint out of the spray tip. Theu never spray properly again (experience speaking). Fish them out with needle nose pliers next time that you need them, give a quick squirt, and they are as good as if they have never been used before.

    I use 77 to create all kinds of foam core studio props when clear tape isn't quite up to the task.
     
  12. barryjyoung

    barryjyoung Member

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    I would use Heads Up spray on automotive headliner adhesive. Every other type of adhesive I have used with felt soaks the felt reducing the nap. I use headliner adhesive when I glue in the felt in the french fitted presentation cases I make for fine pistols. No discoloration, no saoking and no nap reduction.

    It is available at NAPA, Schucks, Checker, Kragen, Auto Zone and Pep Boys auto parts stores.
     
  13. Colin Graham

    Colin Graham Member

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    That's good to know Barry. I was using the 77 for bellows and it can quickly turn linen or silk into cardboard!