Gold Toner - straight up, with water, or Coke? ;-)

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by mooseontheloose, May 11, 2008.

  1. mooseontheloose

    mooseontheloose Subscriber

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    I'm just getting into fiber-based printing and hopefully toning as well. I know that most toners can be diluted (in various strengths) for different results, but that gold toner (the kind you buy pre-mixed) is used neat. Why is this? Why can't we dilute it? I've tried to find out from the books I have and the internet, but I haven't been able to find anything. This seems like a really simple question with an obvious answer, but I'm just not getting it.

    Just curious I guess -- I like to know the hows and whys of things work they way they do (or don't).

    Rachelle
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Because gold chloride is so expensive. If you buy a kit it can be concentrated and you'd dilute it to working strength, but I have noticed most kits are now at working strength. I guess they think you'll feel better paying for a larger volume of solution.

    Ian
     
  3. mooseontheloose

    mooseontheloose Subscriber

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    Thanks Ian.

    But -- is there only working strength? Why can't it be diluted in different amounts like other toners?
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    It can be, but as you generally tone by inspection - if you're after a colour shift - then it isn't necessary.

    Ian
     
  5. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    The industry does not favor creativity in all respects.
    There is ONE strength and that ONE strength is WORKING
    STRENGTH. It is a ONE-SIZE-FITS-ALL strength. To the
    industries credit though some few chemistries do have
    a range of working strengths.

    For myself I work beyond the range using developers
    and fixers at dilutions the industry would not even
    dream of.

    Generally greater dilution adds to the processing time.
    A producer of chemistry does not want to be the slow
    poke so falls in line with the industry as a whole in
    recommending strengths which yield results in
    line with the rest of the industry.

    As with myself you'll need to plow new ground in
    finding results which satisfy and do so within your
    limits of time available. There are factors other
    than time to consider. Dan
     
  6. cotdt

    cotdt Member

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    i was thinking... since gold chloride is so expensive, wouldn't it be better to buy solid gold and make our own gold chloride? we just put the solid gold in aqua regia to form gold (III) chloride.
     
  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    You really don't want to use Aqua Regia in or near your home / darkroom, the fumes are exceedingly corrosive. I do sometimes make Gold Chloride, but I spent 20 years working in precious metal recovery (gold, silver, platinum and palladium)and so I'm fully aware of all the precautions required.

    Ian